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Dudley Zoo, Dudley Castle: the surviving shell of kiosk I

RIBA28044
Tecton
NOTES: A number of kiosks were scattered throughout the zoo grounds, the concrete roof slabs and steel supporting columns being standardised while the design of each kiosk and its adjoining barriers were varied to suit the particular needs of each site.

Dudley Zoo, Dudley Castle: close-up of the main entrance canopy

RIBA28045
Tecton
NOTES: This commission was the outcome of the succesful modernist work Lubetkin and Tecton had already undertaken at London and Whipsnade zoos. The entrance spans a wide front and is comprised of five ticket kiosks containing eight entrance turnstiles and two exits executed in brick. These are set beneath a roof of independently-supported curved concrete slabs.

Moat Cafe, Dudley Zoo, Dudley Castle: close-up of the fenestration

RIBA28046
Tecton
NOTES: The cafe was deliberately made as light and transparent as possible so as not to obstruct too largely the outstanding view from the moat road down towards the castle grounds.

Castle Restaurant, Dudley Zoo, Dudley Castle: the entrance

RIBA28047
Lubetkin & Tecton
NOTES: The site of the restaurant sloped steeply and this dictated its shape. At the behest of the Office of Works the building had to be kept low. In order to provide a necessary sense of space to the restaurant interior whilst complying with the dictates of the Office of Works, the roof was given a conic shape which greatly enlarged the volume of the room without affecting the external appearance.

Polar Bear Pit, Dudley Zoo, Dudley Castle: the stepped entrance to the spectator gallery

RIBA28048
Lubetkin & Tecton
NOTES: Lubetkin and Tecton adapted a deep natural ravine to provide these three enclosures with the circular polar bear arena situated in the centre ringed by an elevated terrace. This terrace spanned the ravine and afforded excellent viewing facilities for spectators. In addition there were lower viewing areas and the lions and tigers could roam over the various concrete slabs placed at differing levels in the steeply-sided ravine. For the polar bears a diving ramp and an eight-foot deep swimming-pool were provided.

Polar Bear Pit, Dudley Zoo, Dudley Castle

RIBA28049
Lubetkin & Tecton
NOTES: Lubetkin and Tecton adapted a deep natural ravine to provide these three enclosures with the circular polar bear arena situated in the centre ringed by an elevated terrace. This terrace spanned the ravine and afforded excellent viewing facilities for spectators. In addition there were lower viewing areas and the lions and tigers could roam over the various concrete slabs placed at differing levels in the steeply-sided ravine. For the polar bears a diving ramp and an eight-foot deep swimming-pool were provided.

Penguin Pool, London Zoo, Regent's Park, London: the elliptical pool shielded by the curved concrete canopy

RIBA28111
Lubetkin Drake & Tecton
NOTES: This was Tecton's second commission for the Royal Zoological Society, the site consisting of a series of derelict ponds and a paddock. A dramatic design was needed to show off the antics of the penguins and this was achieved by two cantilevered ramps spiralling around one another without any intermediate support. The surrounding trees were kept and a cover provided around part of the elliptical structure to protect the penguins from the sun. The flat paths were coated with plastic rubber, the steps were of slate and the concrete ramps were kept wet by a revolving fountain. The structure was allowed under a clause in the London Building Act which exempted from the regulations buildings under a certain size which were not destined for human habitation and which were more than 30 ft from any other building. The pool had been allowed to fall into a state of disrepair after the Royal Zoological Society encountered strong opposition to its plans for major alterations in 1951. The pool was listed in 1970 and restored in 1988. The executive architects were Lubetkin and Drake.

Penguin Pool entrance, London Zoo, Regent's Park, London

RIBA28112
Lubetkin Drake & Tecton
NOTES: This was Tecton's second commission for the Royal Zoological Society, the site consisting of a series of derelict ponds and a paddock. A dramatic design was needed to show off the antics of the penguins and this was achieved by two cantilevered ramps spiralling around one another without any intermediate support. The surrounding trees were kept and a cover provided around part of the elliptical structure to protect the penguins from the sun. The flat paths were coated with plastic rubber, the steps were of slate and the concrete ramps were kept wet by a revolving fountain. The structure was allowed under a clause in the London Building Act which exempted from the regulations buildings under a certain size which were not destined for human habitation and which were more than 30 ft from any other building. The pool had been allowed to fall into a state of disrepair after the Royal Zoological Society encountered strong opposition to its plans for major alterations in 1951. The pool was listed in 1970 and restored in 1988. The executive architects were Lubetkin and Drake.

Penguin Pool, London Zoo, Regent's Park, London: penguins at play

RIBA28113
Lubetkin Drake & Tecton
NOTES: This was Tecton's second commission for the Royal Zoological Society, the site consisting of a series of derelict ponds and a paddock. A dramatic design was needed to show off the antics of the penguins and this was achieved by two cantilevered ramps spiralling around one another without any intermediate support. The surrounding trees were kept and a cover provided around part of the elliptical structure to protect the penguins from the sun. The flat paths were coated with plastic rubber, the steps were of slate and the concrete ramps were kept wet by a revolving fountain. The structure was allowed under a clause in the London Building Act which exempted from the regulations buildings under a certain size which were not destined for human habitation and which were more than 30 ft from any other building. The pool had been allowed to fall into a state of disrepair after the Royal Zoological Society encountered strong opposition to its plans for major alterations in 1951. The pool was listed in 1970 and restored in 1988. The executive architects were Lubetkin and Drake.
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