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Reconstruction of an amphitheatre, Pozzuoli, near Naples, and a fishpond, Bacoli, near Naples: sketches for the reconstructed plans

RIBA125547
NOTES: This drawing is numbered XIV/3 recto in the Burlington-Devonshire Collection.

Law Courts, Gothenburg: the internal courtyard with the older building on the left and Asplund's glass wall to the right

RIBA132252
Asplund, Erik Gunnar (1885-1940)
NOTES: The original law courts were built in 1672 by Nicodemus Tessin, but were rebuilt after a fire in 1732. In 1814-1817 an upper storey was added and the facade reworked by C. W. Carlberg. Later in the 19th century wings were added to the north and west, creating a central courtyard and the adjacent Commandant's House was taken over in1880 for use as offices. Asplund won a competition to redesign the courts in 1913, which was finally completed in 1937. See RIBA159231 for a colour version of this image.

Woodland Cemetery, Stockholm: the Monument Hall and Chapel of the Holy Cross, with the Resurrection Monument on the far right

RIBA132326
Asplund, Erik Gunnar (1885-1940)
NOTES: Asplund and Lewerentz won the competition for the new cemetery in 1915 and spent the next 25 years developing the cemetery in a landscape of wooded pines populated by small chapels. The Chapel of the Holy Cross is by Asplund (1935-1940) and the Resurrection Monument by Lundquist was originally shown at the 1930 Stockholm Exhibition. See RIBA132341 for a colour version of this image.

Woodland Cemetery, Stockholm: the Monument Hall and Chapel of the Holy Cross, with the Resurrection Monument on the far right

RIBA132341
Asplund, Erik Gunnar (1885-1940)
NOTES: Asplund and Lewerentz won the competition for the new cemetery in 1915 and spent the next 25 years developing the cemetery in a landscape of wooded pines populated by small chapels.The Chapel of the Holy Cross is by Asplund (1935-1940) and the Resurrection Monument by Lundquist was originally shown at the 1930 Stockholm Exhibition. See RIBA132326 for a black and white version of this image.

Penguin Pool, London Zoo, Regent's Park, London

RIBA132921
Tecton
NOTES: This was Tecton's second commission for the Royal Zoological Society, the site consisting of a series of derelict ponds and a paddock. A dramatic design was needed to show off the antics of the penguins and this was achieved by two cantilevered ramps spiralling around one another without any intermediate support. The surrounding trees were kept and a cover provided around part of the elliptical structure to protect the penguins from the sun. The flat paths were coated with plastic rubber, the steps were of slate and the concrete ramps were kept wet by a revolving fountain. The structure was allowed under a clause in the London Building Act which exempted from the regulations buildings under a certain size which were not destined for human habitation and which were more than 30 ft from any other building. The pool had been allowed to fall into a state of disrepair after the Royal Zoological Society encountered strong opposition to its plans for major alterations in 1951. The pool was listed in 1970 and restored in 1988. The executive architects were Lubetkin and Drake. See RIBA132929 for a colour version of this image.

Penguin Pool, London Zoo, Regent's Park, London

RIBA132923
Tecton
NOTES: This was Tecton's second commission for the Royal Zoological Society, the site consisting of a series of derelict ponds and a paddock. A dramatic design was needed to show off the antics of the penguins and this was achieved by two cantilevered ramps spiralling around one another without any intermediate support. The surrounding trees were kept and a cover provided around part of the elliptical structure to protect the penguins from the sun. The flat paths were coated with plastic rubber, the steps were of slate and the concrete ramps were kept wet by a revolving fountain. The structure was allowed under a clause in the London Building Act which exempted from the regulations buildings under a certain size which were not destined for human habitation and which were more than 30 ft from any other building. The pool had been allowed to fall into a state of disrepair after the Royal Zoological Society encountered strong opposition to its plans for major alterations in 1951. The pool was listed in 1970 and restored in 1988. The executive architects were Lubetkin and Drake. See RIBA132931 for a colour version of this image.

Penguin Pool, London Zoo, Regent's Park, London: detail of the ramps

RIBA132924
Tecton
NOTES: This was Tecton's second commission for the Royal Zoological Society, the site consisting of a series of derelict ponds and a paddock. A dramatic design was needed to show off the antics of the penguins and this was achieved by two cantilevered ramps spiralling around one another without any intermediate support. The surrounding trees were kept and a cover provided around part of the elliptical structure to protect the penguins from the sun. The flat paths were coated with plastic rubber, the steps were of slate and the concrete ramps were kept wet by a revolving fountain. The structure was allowed under a clause in the London Building Act which exempted from the regulations buildings under a certain size which were not destined for human habitation and which were more than 30 ft from any other building. The pool had been allowed to fall into a state of disrepair after the Royal Zoological Society encountered strong opposition to its plans for major alterations in 1951. The pool was listed in 1970 and restored in 1988. The executive architects were Lubetkin and Drake. See RIBA132932 for a colour version of this image.

Penguin Pool, London Zoo, Regent's Park, London: the main ramp

RIBA132925
Tecton
NOTES: This was Tecton's second commission for the Royal Zoological Society, the site consisting of a series of derelict ponds and a paddock. A dramatic design was needed to show off the antics of the penguins and this was achieved by two cantilevered ramps spiralling around one another without any intermediate support. The surrounding trees were kept and a cover provided around part of the elliptical structure to protect the penguins from the sun. The flat paths were coated with plastic rubber, the steps were of slate and the concrete ramps were kept wet by a revolving fountain. The structure was allowed under a clause in the London Building Act which exempted from the regulations buildings under a certain size which were not destined for human habitation and which were more than 30 ft from any other building. The pool had been allowed to fall into a state of disrepair after the Royal Zoological Society encountered strong opposition to its plans for major alterations in 1951. The pool was listed in 1970 and restored in 1988. The executive architects were Lubetkin and Drake. See RIBA132933 for a colour version of this image.

Penguin Pool, London Zoo, Regent's Park, London

RIBA132929
Tecton
NOTES: This was Tecton's second commission for the Royal Zoological Society, the site consisting of a series of derelict ponds and a paddock. A dramatic design was needed to show off the antics of the penguins and this was achieved by two cantilevered ramps spiralling around one another without any intermediate support. The surrounding trees were kept and a cover provided around part of the elliptical structure to protect the penguins from the sun. The flat paths were coated with plastic rubber, the steps were of slate and the concrete ramps were kept wet by a revolving fountain. The structure was allowed under a clause in the London Building Act which exempted from the regulations buildings under a certain size which were not destined for human habitation and which were more than 30 ft from any other building. The pool had been allowed to fall into a state of disrepair after the Royal Zoological Society encountered strong opposition to its plans for major alterations in 1951. The pool was listed in 1970 and restored in 1988. The executive architects were Lubetkin and Drake. See RIBA132921 for a black and white version of this image.

Penguin Pool, London Zoo, Regent's Park, London

RIBA132931
Tecton
NOTES: This was Tecton's second commission for the Royal Zoological Society, the site consisting of a series of derelict ponds and a paddock. A dramatic design was needed to show off the antics of the penguins and this was achieved by two cantilevered ramps spiralling around one another without any intermediate support. The surrounding trees were kept and a cover provided around part of the elliptical structure to protect the penguins from the sun. The flat paths were coated with plastic rubber, the steps were of slate and the concrete ramps were kept wet by a revolving fountain. The structure was allowed under a clause in the London Building Act which exempted from the regulations buildings under a certain size which were not destined for human habitation and which were more than 30 ft from any other building. The pool had been allowed to fall into a state of disrepair after the Royal Zoological Society encountered strong opposition to its plans for major alterations in 1951. The pool was listed in 1970 and restored in 1988. The executive architects were Lubetkin and Drake. See RIBA132923 for a black and white version of this image.

Penguin Pool, London Zoo, Regent's Park, London: detail of the ramps

RIBA132932
Tecton
NOTES: This was Tecton's second commission for the Royal Zoological Society, the site consisting of a series of derelict ponds and a paddock. A dramatic design was needed to show off the antics of the penguins and this was achieved by two cantilevered ramps spiralling around one another without any intermediate support. The surrounding trees were kept and a cover provided around part of the elliptical structure to protect the penguins from the sun. The flat paths were coated with plastic rubber, the steps were of slate and the concrete ramps were kept wet by a revolving fountain. The structure was allowed under a clause in the London Building Act which exempted from the regulations buildings under a certain size which were not destined for human habitation and which were more than 30 ft from any other building. The pool had been allowed to fall into a state of disrepair after the Royal Zoological Society encountered strong opposition to its plans for major alterations in 1951. The pool was listed in 1970 and restored in 1988. The executive architects were Lubetkin and Drake. See RIBA132924 for a black and white version of this image.

Penguin Pool, London Zoo, Regent's Park, London: the main ramp

RIBA132933
Tecton
NOTES: This was Tecton's second commission for the Royal Zoological Society, the site consisting of a series of derelict ponds and a paddock. A dramatic design was needed to show off the antics of the penguins and this was achieved by two cantilevered ramps spiralling around one another without any intermediate support. The surrounding trees were kept and a cover provided around part of the elliptical structure to protect the penguins from the sun. The flat paths were coated with plastic rubber, the steps were of slate and the concrete ramps were kept wet by a revolving fountain. The structure was allowed under a clause in the London Building Act which exempted from the regulations buildings under a certain size which were not destined for human habitation and which were more than 30 ft from any other building. The pool had been allowed to fall into a state of disrepair after the Royal Zoological Society encountered strong opposition to its plans for major alterations in 1951. The pool was listed in 1970 and restored in 1988. The executive architects were Lubetkin and Drake. See RIBA132925 for a black and white version of this image.
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