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Hestercombe House and gardens, Taunton: one of the water channels in the parterre looking back towards the house

RIBA150568
Bampfylde, Coplestone Warre (1720-1791)
NOTES: The house dates back to the 17th century but was extensively remodelled in the 18th and 19th centuries. But the house is famous for its gardens. First landscaped in the 1750s by the then owner Coplestone Warre Bampfylde, a landscape designer and amateur painter. Then in 1904, Lutyens with Jekyll responsible for the planting created one of his largest single garden designs, creating a series of paved terraces, raised walks and water features and a grand Orangery of 1906-1908. See RIBA161608 for a colour version of this image.

Hestercombe House and gardens, Taunton: the gardens seen from the upper terrace of the house with the wider landscape beyond

RIBA150572
Bampfylde, Coplestone Warre (1720-1791)
NOTES: The house dates back to the 17th century but was extensively remodelled in the 18th and 19th centuries. But the house is famous for its gardens. First landscaped in the 1750s by the then owner Coplestone Warre Bampfylde, a landscape designer and amateur painter. Then in 1904, Lutyens with Jekyll responsible for the planting created one of his largest single garden designs, creating a series of paved terraces, raised walks and water features and a grand Orangery of 1906-1908. See RIBA161612 for a colour version of this image.

De Overloop, housing for the elderly, Almere-Haven: the enclosed garden with water feature

RIBA155612
Hertzberger, Herman (1932-)
NOTES: See RIBA118465 for a black and white version of this image.

De Overloop, housing for the elderly, Almere-Haven: the enclosed garden with water feature

RIBA155618
Hertzberger, Herman (1932-)
NOTES: See RIBA118471 for a black and white version of this image.

Roy Square, Narrow Street, Tower Hamlets, London, looking out onto the square with its basins and canal from one end of the square

RIBA156056
Ian Ritchie Architects
NOTES: See RIBA134046 for a black and white version of this image.

Sainsbury Building, Worcester College, Oxford: entrance from the Provost's orchard

RIBA157548
MacCormac Jamieson Prichard
NOTES: The building won a Civic Trust award in 1983. See RIBA118250 for a black and white version of this image.

Sainsbury Building, Worcester College, Oxford: the western elevation

RIBA157553
MacCormac Jamieson Prichard
NOTES: The building won a Civic Trust award in 1983. See RIBA118262 for a black and white version of this image.

Workshop block, Warsash College of Maritime Studies, Warsash: seen from the south with the sea-water pont and lifeboat launching gear in the foreground

RIBA158028
Hampshire County Council. County Architects Department
NOTES: The original college was built in 1962, designed by Richard Sheppard, Robson & Partners. This workshop is part of new phase of building, which will include a new teaching block and library. See RIBA133552 for a black and white version of this image.

Law Courts, Gothenburg: the internal courtyard with the older building on the left and Asplund's glass wall to the right

RIBA159231
Asplund, Erik Gunnar (1885-1940)
NOTES: The original law courts were built in 1672 by Nicodemus Tessin, but were rebuilt after a fire in 1732. In 1814-1817 an upper storey was added and the facade reworked by C. W. Carlberg. Later in the 19th century wings were added to the north and west, creating a central courtyard and the adjacent Commandant's House was taken over in1880 for use as offices. Asplund won a competition to redesign the courts in 1913, which was finally completed in 1937. See RIBA132252 for a black and white version of this image.

Crookham Junior School, Crookham, Hampshire

RIBA159254
Edward Cullinan Architects
NOTES: This was a refurbishment of a Mark 1, Second Consortium of Local Authorites (SCOLA) schools, built in the 1960s by Hampshire County Council. The refurbishment centered round the replacing, recladding and insulating much of the original fabric. See RIBA133114 for a black and white version of this image.

Folly Farm, Sulhamstead, Berkshire: the gardens

RIBA159788
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: Folly Farm was a 17th century farmhouse, which was extended twice by Lutyens in the early 20th century. First, shortly after 1906 by the new owner H.H. Cochrane, who employed Lutyens to enlarge the house for him, and produced a relatively small, dolls-house-like extension in a late 17th century style. He also (with the help of Jekyll), laid out the first phase of the garden in a simple manner, adjacent to the east and south fronts. In 1912 the house was bought by Zachary Merton who also employed Lutyens to extend the house to the west in his `Surrey style'. At the same time a parterre garden was created and a Dutch canal replaced previous tennis courts, with planting advice from Jekyll.
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