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Tuindorp Vreewijk, Rotterdam

RIBA107621
Berlage, Hendrik Petrus (1856-1934)
NOTES: Tuindorp (literally garden village) Vreewijk, was Rotterdam's first garden village, and the brainchild of the banker K.P. van der Mandele. In 1913 he bought a patch of land in South Rotterdam and commissioned Berlage to draw up an urban plan for it. The aim was for a mixed tenancy with many office clerks, council officials and teachers living alongside manual labourers. Berlage's design with its angled street pattern which retained the original watercourses on site was fleshed out in 1916 by Granpre Moliere, Verhagen, Kok, De Roos and Overeijnder. Building began slowly in 1917, owing to shortages of materials in the First World War. By 1942 a total of 5700 houses had been built. A major renovation of the houses was carried out in 1981.

Tuindorp Vreewijk, Rotterdam

RIBA107622
Berlage, Hendrik Petrus (1856-1934)
NOTES: Tuindorp (literally garden village) Vreewijk, was Rotterdam's first garden village, and the brainchild of the banker K.P. van der Mandele. In 1913 he bought a patch of land in South Rotterdam and commissioned Berlage to draw up an urban plan for it. The aim was for a mixed tenancy with many office clerks, council officials and teachers living alongside manual labourers. Berlage's design with its angled street pattern which retained the original watercourses on site was fleshed out in 1916 by Granpre Moliere, Verhagen, Kok, De Roos and Overeijnder. Building began slowly in 1917, owing to shortages of materials in the First World War. By 1942 a total of 5700 houses had been built. A major renovation of the houses was carried out in 1981.

Tuindorp Vreewijk, Rotterdam: a community centre or church hall

RIBA107623
Berlage, Hendrik Petrus (1856-1934)
NOTES: Tuindorp (literally garden village) Vreewijk, was Rotterdam's first garden village, and the brainchild of the banker K.P. van der Mandele. In 1913 he bought a patch of land in South Rotterdam and commissioned Berlage to draw up an urban plan for it. The aim was for a mixed tenancy with many office clerks, council officials and teachers living alongside manual labourers. Berlage's design with its angled street pattern which retained the original watercourses on site was fleshed out in 1916 by Granpre Moliere, Verhagen, Kok, De Roos and Overeijnder. Building began slowly in 1917, owing to shortages of materials in the First World War. By 1942 a total of 5700 houses had been built. A major renovation of the houses was carried out in 1981.

Tuindorp Vreewijk, Rotterdam: a church hall or community centre

RIBA107624
Berlage, Hendrik Petrus (1856-1934)
NOTES: Tuindorp (literally garden village) Vreewijk, was Rotterdam's first garden village, and the brainchild of the banker K.P. van der Mandele. In 1913 he bought a patch of land in South Rotterdam and commissioned Berlage to draw up an urban plan for it. The aim was for a mixed tenancy with many office clerks, council officials and teachers living alongside manual labourers. Berlage's design with its angled street pattern which retained the original watercourses on site was fleshed out in 1916 by Granpre Moliere, Verhagen, Kok, De Roos and Overeijnder. Building began slowly in 1917, owing to shortages of materials in the First World War. By 1942 a total of 5700 houses had been built. A major renovation of the houses was carried out in 1981.

Tuindorp Vreewijk, Rotterdam: an archway into one of the enclaves

RIBA107625
Berlage, Hendrik Petrus (1856-1934)
NOTES: Tuindorp (literally garden village) Vreewijk, was Rotterdam's first garden village, and the brainchild of the banker K.P. van der Mandele. In 1913 he bought a patch of land in South Rotterdam and commissioned Berlage to draw up an urban plan for it. The aim was for a mixed tenancy with many office clerks, council officials and teachers living alongside manual labourers. Berlage's design with its angled street pattern which retained the original watercourses on site was fleshed out in 1916 by Granpre Moliere, Verhagen, Kok, De Roos and Overeijnder. Building began slowly in 1917, owing to shortages of materials in the First World War. By 1942 a total of 5700 houses had been built. A major renovation of the houses was carried out in 1981.

Tuindorp Vreewijk, Rotterdam

RIBA107626
Berlage, Hendrik Petrus (1856-1934)
NOTES: Tuindorp (literally garden village) Vreewijk, was Rotterdam's first garden village, and the brainchild of the banker K.P. van der Mandele. In 1913 he bought a patch of land in South Rotterdam and commissioned Berlage to draw up an urban plan for it. The aim was for a mixed tenancy with many office clerks, council officials and teachers living alongside manual labourers. Berlage's design with its angled street pattern which retained the original watercourses on site was fleshed out in 1916 by Granpre Moliere, Verhagen, Kok, De Roos and Overeijnder. Building began slowly in 1917, owing to shortages of materials in the First World War. By 1942 a total of 5700 houses had been built. A major renovation of the houses was carried out in 1981.

Tuindorp Vreewijk, Rotterdam

RIBA107627
Berlage, Hendrik Petrus (1856-1934)
NOTES: Tuindorp (literally garden village) Vreewijk, was Rotterdam's first garden village, and the brainchild of the banker K.P. van der Mandele. In 1913 he bought a patch of land in South Rotterdam and commissioned Berlage to draw up an urban plan for it. The aim was for a mixed tenancy with many office clerks, council officials and teachers living alongside manual labourers. Berlage's design with its angled street pattern which retained the original watercourses on site was fleshed out in 1916 by Granpre Moliere, Verhagen, Kok, De Roos and Overeijnder. Building began slowly in 1917, owing to shortages of materials in the First World War. By 1942 a total of 5700 houses had been built. A major renovation of the houses was carried out in 1981.

Tuindorp Vreewijk, Rotterdam

RIBA107655
Berlage, Hendrik Petrus (1856-1934)
NOTES: Tuindorp (literally garden village) Vreewijk, was Rotterdam's first garden village, and the brainchild of the banker K.P. van der Mandele. In 1913 he bought a patch of land in South Rotterdam and commissioned Berlage to draw up an urban plan for it. The aim was for a mixed tenancy with many office clerks, council officials and teachers living alongside manual labourers. Berlage's design with its angled street pattern which retained the original watercourses on site was fleshed out in 1916 by Granpre Moliere, Verhagen, Kok, De Roos and Overeijnder. Building began slowly in 1917, owing to shortages of materials in the First World War. By 1942 a total of 5700 houses had been built. A major renovation of the houses was carried out in 1981.

Tuindorp Vreewijk, Rotterdam

RIBA107656
Berlage, Hendrik Petrus (1856-1934)
NOTES: Tuindorp (literally garden village) Vreewijk, was Rotterdam's first garden village, and the brainchild of the banker K.P. van der Mandele. In 1913 he bought a patch of land in South Rotterdam and commissioned Berlage to draw up an urban plan for it. The aim was for a mixed tenancy with many office clerks, council officials and teachers living alongside manual labourers. Berlage's design with its angled street pattern which retained the original watercourses on site was fleshed out in 1916 by Granpre Moliere, Verhagen, Kok, De Roos and Overeijnder. Building began slowly in 1917, owing to shortages of materials in the First World War. By 1942 a total of 5700 houses had been built. A major renovation of the houses was carried out in 1981.

Tuindorp Vreewijk, Rotterdam: detail of entrance doorway

RIBA107657
Berlage, Hendrik Petrus (1856-1934)
NOTES: Tuindorp (literally garden village) Vreewijk, was Rotterdam's first garden village, and the brainchild of the banker K.P. van der Mandele. In 1913 he bought a patch of land in South Rotterdam and commissioned Berlage to draw up an urban plan for it. The aim was for a mixed tenancy with many office clerks, council officials and teachers living alongside manual labourers. Berlage's design with its angled street pattern which retained the original watercourses on site was fleshed out in 1916 by Granpre Moliere, Verhagen, Kok, De Roos and Overeijnder. Building began slowly in 1917, owing to shortages of materials in the First World War. By 1942 a total of 5700 houses had been built. A major renovation of the houses was carried out in 1981.

Elan Valley dam, Rhyader: the model village built for the corporation employees

RIBA119688
Buckland, Herbert
NOTES: The Elan Valley scheme was a project to supply clean water to Birmingham, some 20 miles away. The proposal was to dam the Elan and Caerwen rivers and originally three dams were constructed in Elan Valley by engineers Gray and Mansergh between 1893-1904. These comprised Caban Coch with Garreg-ddu, Pen-y-garreg and Craig Coch. Three more dams were proposed in the Caerwen Valley, but postponed owing to the Second World War and with improvements to materials and engineering meant a much larger concrete dam could be built higher up the valley. This was the Caerwen dam which was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II in 1952. The model village seen here was built from 1900.
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