Welcome to RIBApix!
You have no items in your basket.
Close
Filters
Search

Vicarages

View as Grid List
Sort by

Designs for the vicarage, Coedana, Llannerch-y-Medd, Anglesey: plans, elevations and sections of house

RIBA97793
Williams-Ellis, Sir Clough (1883-1978)
NOTES: Grade II listed and now called the Old Rectory.

Designs for the vicarage, Coedana, Llannerch-y-Medd, Anglesey: plans, elevations and sections of alternative design for the house

RIBA97794
Williams-Ellis, Sir Clough (1883-1978)
NOTES: Grade II listed and now called the Old Rectory.

Designs for the vicarage, Coedana, Llannerch-y-Medd, Anglesey: plans, elevations and sections of stables

RIBA97795
Williams-Ellis, Sir Clough (1883-1978)
NOTES: Grade II listed and now called the Old Rectory.

Designs for the reconstruction and restoration of St Lawrence Jewry, Gresham Street, City of London: section A-A showing north side of flat (Rectory) and east end of church

RIBA97842
Wren, Sir Christopher (1632-1723)
NOTES: Sir Christopher Wren's church (1687) was extensively damaged by bombs in December 1940. It was restored by Cecil Brown in association with E. B. Glanfield between 1954 and 1957, but no longer as a parish church, instead as the official church of the Corporation of the City of London.

Designs for the reconstruction and restoration of St Lawrence Jewry, Gresham Street, City of London: section C-C showing flat (Rectory) and civic chapel

RIBA97843
Wren, Sir Christopher (1632-1723)
NOTES: Sir Christopher Wren's church (1687) was extensively damaged by bombs in December 1940. It was restored by Cecil Brown in association with E. B. Glanfield between 1954 and 1957, but no longer as a parish church, instead as the official church of the Corporation of the City of London.

Designs for the reconstruction and restoration of St Lawrence Jewry, Gresham Street, City of London: first floor plan showing parish room and part of the flat (Rectory)

RIBA97845
Wren, Sir Christopher (1632-1723)
NOTES: Sir Christopher Wren's church (1687) was extensively damaged by bombs in December 1940. It was restored by Cecil Brown in association with E. B. Glanfield between 1954 and 1957, but no longer as a parish church, instead as the official church of the Corporation of the City of London.

Designs for the reconstruction and restoration of St Lawrence Jewry, Gresham Street, City of London: second floor plan showing living accommodation in the flat (Rectory)

RIBA97846
Wren, Sir Christopher (1632-1723)
NOTES: Sir Christopher Wren's church (1687) was extensively damaged by bombs in December 1940. It was restored by Cecil Brown in association with E. B. Glanfield between 1954 and 1957, but no longer as a parish church, instead as the official church of the Corporation of the City of London.

Designs for the reconstruction and restoration of St Lawrence Jewry, Gresham Street, City of London: section B-B showing north side of flat (Rectory) and tower

RIBA97848
Wren, Sir Christopher (1632-1723)
NOTES: Sir Christopher Wren's church (1687) was extensively damaged by bombs in December 1940. It was restored by Cecil Brown in association with E. B. Glanfield between 1954 and 1957, but no longer as a parish church, instead as the official church of the Corporation of the City of London.

Designs for the reconstruction and restoration of St Lawrence Jewry, Gresham Street, City of London: section A-A showing north side of flat (Rectory) and east end of church

RIBA97849
Wren, Sir Christopher (1632-1723)
NOTES: Sir Christopher Wren's church (1687) was extensively damaged by bombs in December 1940. It was restored by Cecil Brown in association with E. B. Glanfield between 1954 and 1957, but no longer as a parish church, instead as the official church of the Corporation of the City of London.

Designs for the reconstruction and restoration of St Lawrence Jewry, Gresham Street, City of London: section B-B showing north side of flat (Rectory) and tower

RIBA97850
Wren, Sir Christopher (1632-1723)
NOTES: Sir Christopher Wren's church (1687) was extensively damaged by bombs in December 1940. It was restored by Cecil Brown in association with E. B. Glanfield between 1954 and 1957, but no longer as a parish church, instead as the official church of the Corporation of the City of London.

Drawings for St Saviour's Church and Institute, Old Oak Road, Acton, London, for the Royal Association in Aid of the Deaf and Dumb: plan of the church and first floor and top floor of chaplain's house

RIBA98994
Maufe, Sir Edward Brantwood (1883-1974)
NOTES: The Royal Association in Aid of the Deaf and Dumb (later the Royal Association for Deaf People) began in 1854. Their first purpose-built deaf church, at Oxford Street and Lumley Street, opened in 1873 to designs by A. W. Blomfield. This church was demolished in 1923 in the face of redevelopment by the Grosvenor Estate and the compensation paid enabled the charity to purchase two new sites, in Acton and Clapham, and they commissioned Edward Maufe who provided two very similar sets of designs for the new churches. The Acton church retained the dedication and some of the fittings from the Oxford Street church. The institute is on the ground floor with the church above it with a raked floor. The church and institute building (but not the former, and much altered, chaplain's house) is listed Grade II. The church closed in 2014 and was sold in 2015; it opened in 2016 as St Thomas Cathedral in the Syriac Orthodox Church.

Drawings for St Saviour's Church and Institute, Old Oak Road, Acton, London, for the Royal Association in Aid of the Deaf and Dumb: cross section A-B through the chaplain's house and church and institute building and longitudinal section C-D through the church and institute building

RIBA98995
Maufe, Sir Edward Brantwood (1883-1974)
NOTES: The Royal Association in Aid of the Deaf and Dumb (later the Royal Association for Deaf People) began in 1854. Their first purpose-built deaf church, at Oxford Street and Lumley Street, opened in 1873 to designs by A. W. Blomfield. This church was demolished in 1923 in the face of redevelopment by the Grosvenor Estate and the compensation paid enabled the charity to purchase two new sites, in Acton and Clapham, and they commissioned Edward Maufe who provided two very similar sets of designs for the new churches. The Acton church retained the dedication and some of the fittings from the Oxford Street church. The institute is on the ground floor with the church above it with a raked floor. The church and institute building (but not the former, and much altered, chaplain's house) is listed Grade II. The church closed in 2014 and was sold in 2015; it opened in 2016 as St Thomas Cathedral in the Syriac Orthodox Church.
Close
)
CLOSE