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Plastic buffet car in the process of being fitted out

RIBA93963
Levin, Richard (1910-2000)
NOTES: This is the original Pullman coach interior being fitted out as a buffet car called the Trianon Bar for the re-introduction of the Golden Arrow in 1946 for the Southern Railway London to Dover boat train. The designer was Richard Levin of the Industrial Design Unit of Bakelite Limited and it was also the first all-plastics refreshment car to run on British railways.

Plastic buffet car in the process of being fitted out

RIBA93964
Levin, Richard (1910-2000)
NOTES: This is the original Pullman coach interior being fitted out as a buffet car called the Trianon Bar for the re-introduction of the Golden Arrow in 1946 for the Southern Railway London to Dover boat train. The designer was Richard Levin of the Industrial Design Unit of Bakelite Limited and it was also the first all-plastics refreshment car to run on British railways.

Plastic buffet car in the process of being fitted out

RIBA93965
Levin, Richard (1910-2000)
NOTES: This is the original Pullman coach interior being fitted out as a buffet car called the Trianon Bar for the re-introduction of the Golden Arrow in 1946 for the Southern Railway London to Dover boat train. The designer was Richard Levin of the Industrial Design Unit of Bakelite Limited and it was also the first all-plastics refreshment car to run on British railways.

Plastic buffet car as fully flitted out

RIBA93966
Levin, Richard (1910-2000)
NOTES: The interior of this Pullman car was remodelled as the Trianon Bar for the re-introduction of the Golden Arrow in 1946. The designer was Richard Levin, employed by Bakelite Limited and it was the first all-plastic refreshment car to run on Britain's railways. The walls are alternate grey and pink Warerite panels, while the bar top and transverse partition are in cream Warerite.

Pen and watercolour capriccio, Victorian street scene with factories and a pair of town houses transported by a steam engine

RIBA99401
NOTES: This appears to be a preliminary sketch idea for the illustration entitled 'A Steam Palace' which appeared in the 'Saturday Book', no. 27, 1967.

Study for the tunnel on the Danube Canal Line low-level station, with a pedestrian bridge above, Vienna

RIBA106604
Wagner, Otto (1841-1918)
SOURCE: Otto Wagner, Einige Skizzen, Projecte und ausgefuhrte Bauwerke (Vienna: Schroll, 1890-1922), Band 2, no. 28

Lime Street Station, Liverpool

RIBA135244
Cunningham, John (1799-1873)
NOTES: Lime Street Station opened in 1836 and was one of the earliest railway stations in the world. It was designed by John Cunningham, Arthur Hill Holme and John Foster Junior. The train shed, added in 1867 by William Baker and Francis Stevenson spans 200 feet and was the largest span until superceded by the train shed at St Pancras by John Barlow at 240 feet in 1868.

Lime Street Station, Liverpool

RIBA135245
Cunningham, John (1799-1873)
NOTES: Lime Street Station opened in 1836 and was one of the earliest railway stations in the world. It was designed by John Cunningham, Arthur Hill Holme and John Foster Junior. The train shed, added in 1867 by William Baker and Francis Stevenson spans 200 feet and was the largest span until superceded by the train shed at St Pancras by John Barlow at 240 feet in 1868.

Lime Street Station, Liverpool

RIBA135248
Cunningham, John (1799-1873)
NOTES: Lime Street Station opened in 1836 and was one of the earliest railway stations in the world. It was designed by John Cunningham, Arthur Hill Holme and John Foster Junior. The train shed, added in 1867 by William Baker and Francis Stevenson spans 200 feet and was the largest span until superceded by the train shed at St Pancras by John Barlow at 240 feet in 1868.

Lime Street Station, Liverpool

RIBA135249
Cunningham, John (1799-1873)
NOTES: Lime Street Station opened in 1836 and was one of the earliest railway stations in the world. It was designed by John Cunningham, Arthur Hill Holme and John Foster Junior. The train shed, added in 1867 by William Baker and Francis Stevenson spans 200 feet and was the largest span until superceded by the train shed at St Pancras by John Barlow at 240 feet in 1868.
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