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Design for Freemasons' Hall (Masonic Peace Memorial Building), Great Queen Street, London: elevation, perspective and section of the Master's chair

RIBA36620
Ashley & Newman
NOTES: This image was made between 1926 and 1933. This, the third Freemasons' Hall to be built in Queen Anne Street, is both the headquarters of the United Grand Lodge of England and the principal meeting place for Lodges in London. It was built in 1927-1933 as a memorial to the many Freemasons who died on active service during World War I and was initially known as the Masonic Peace Memorial.

Designs for a proposed royal palace and outbuildings, London: transverse section through the throne room showing canopied throne and royal arms

RIBA84370
Gibbs, James (1682-1754)
NOTES: This project, about which almost nothing is known, probably dates from circa 1728- circa 1740.

Designs for the House of Lords, Houses of Parliament, Palace of Westminster, London: side elevation of the throne canopy, elevation of panelling to the side of the throne and profiles of mouldings

RIBA96240
Barry, Sir Charles (1795-1860)
NOTES: From the 'Large Atlas Folio: Gothic and Italian', a volume of tracings of office drawings made by James Murray during the time he worked in Barry's office, 1839-1847. This tracing is probably of a Pugin drawing.

Designs for the House of Lords, Houses of Parliament, Palace of Westminster, London: plans at different stages, elevation, sections and details of octagonal superstructure to the canopy above the throne (preliminary design)

RIBA96241
Barry, Sir Charles (1795-1860)
NOTES: From the 'Large Atlas Folio: Gothic and Italian', a volume of tracings of office drawings made by James Murray during the time he worked in Barry's office, 1839-1847. This tracing is probably of a Pugin drawing.

Designs for the House of Lords, Houses of Parliament, Palace of Westminster, London: elevations of exterior and interior of side canopies of the throne

RIBA96242
Barry, Sir Charles (1795-1860)
NOTES: From the 'Large Atlas Folio: Gothic and Italian', a volume of tracings of office drawings made by James Murray during the time he worked in Barry's office, 1839-1847.

Designs for the House of Lords, Houses of Parliament, Palace of Westminster, London: details of throne and side chairs

RIBA96244
Barry, Sir Charles (1795-1860)
NOTES: From the 'Large Atlas Folio: Gothic and Italian', a volume of tracings of office drawings made by James Murray during the time he worked in Barry's office, 1839-1847.

Design for a chair bearing the royal coat of arms and the letters 'E' and 'R' (the royal cypher of King Edward VII): front and side elevations

RIBA97504
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: This drawing dates from the time when Lutyens was producing designs for his New Delhi project.

Design for thrones, House of Lords, Houses of Parliament, Palace of Westminster, London: sketch plans, elevation and section

RIBA98134
Barry, Sir Charles (1795-1860)
NOTES: These drawings, presented in 1938 by Caryl Arthur Ransome Barry (BarryÔÇÖs great-grandson), would appear to be those kept by the family to prove Barry's authorship of the design in the dispute between his heirs and those of A. W. N. Pugin. A label, now detached, says this is a "Sketch by Sir Charles Barry in 1844 for a rough model of the throne shewing modifications of detail from the general drawing A. N.B. This is the executed design."

Design for the throne and its surrounding canopy, House of Lords, Houses of Parliament, Palace of Westminster, London: plan, elevations, section and details

RIBA98137
Pugin, Augustus Welby Northmore (1812-1852)
NOTES: This drawing dates from Pugin's second period of collaboration with Barry, from August 1836 to March 1837, during the preparation needed to make a detailed estimate of Barry's revised design of 1836. This drawing almost certainly dates from 1836 because the royal coat of arms on the back of the throne indicates it was made during the reign of William IV. The final design for the elevation of the throne end of the House of Lords (made 8 years later) has few similarities with this scheme. These drawings, presented in 1938 by Caryl Arthur Ransome Barry (BarryÔÇÖs great-grandson), would appear to be those kept by the family to prove Barry's authorship of the design in the dispute between his heirs and those of A. W. N. Pugin.
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