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Billingsgate fishmarket, Billingsgate Wharf, Lower Thames Street, London

RIBA15429
SOURCE: R. Ackermann. The Microcosm of London (London, 1835), vol. I, pl. 9 NOTES: Billingsgate fishmarket was originally situated in the streets around Billingsgate Wharf and was officially established as a fishmarket by an Act of Parliament in 1698. The City Corporation moved the market off the streets in 1849 to a new building on the waterfront. This was demolished and replaced by an arcaded market hall in 1875.

St Paul's, Covent Garden Market, London: hustings for the Westminster elections erected in the piazza

RIBA15445
Jones, Inigo (1573-1652)
SOURCE: R. Ackermann. The Microcosm of London (London, 1835), vol. I, pl. 26

Leadenhall Market, Gracechurch Street, London

RIBA15469
SOURCE: R. Ackermann. The Microcosm of London (London, 1835), vol. II, pl. 50 NOTES: The market takes its name from a mansion built in stone with a lead roof belonging to the Neville family built on this site in the early 14th century. Both the market and the mansion were destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. The rebuilt market, fashioned around three courtyards, was replaced in 1881 by buildings designed by Horace Jones.

Pillory at Charing Cross, London: view of two offenders in the stocks while the crowd looks on jeering

RIBA15481
SOURCE: R. Ackermann. The Microcosm of London (London, 1835), vol. II, pl. 62 NOTES: The most famous pillory, a form of punishment which involved the public shaming of the offender, was at Chraing Cross in London. The word Pillory is derived from the French 'pilleur' or 'pelori' from the Greek, meaning a door, hence the use of the stocks where the offender 'is seen as it were with his head through a door'.

St Martin-in-the-Fields, Trafalgar Square, London

RIBA15498
Gibbs, James (1682-1754)
SOURCE: R. Ackermann. The Microcosm of London (London, 1835), vol. III, pl. 79

Children playing in the precinct of low-rise housing, Tavy Bridge, Thamesmead, Greenwich, London

RIBA15741
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 8: Housing' in Architectural Review, vol. 148, September 1970. Thamesmead was planned in 1965-1966 as a new town on the riverside marshes of south-east London between Plumstead and Erith. It was scheduled for completion in 1974 but was never fully finished and the projected population of 60,000 for the new town was downgraded to 45,000 by the end of the 1970s. From then around 400 houses were being built annually and by 1982, the population stood at 20,000. Since 2014 the managment and regeneration of the area has come under the aegis of Peabody.

Pepys Estate, Deptford, London: children playing on a raised walkway

RIBA15751
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: This image is one of many taken for the Architectural Review's 'Manplan 8: Housing' issue of September 1970 for which Ray-Jones was the guest photographer. This image appeared on p.152.

Pepys Estate, Deptford, London: children playing on a raised walkway

RIBA15752
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 8: Housing' in Architectural Review, vol. 148, 1970 Sep.

Dilapidated noble house, Sharjah

RIBA15853
NOTES: Sharjah, bordering Dubai to the north, is the third largest of the seven states which form the United Arab Emirates.
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