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Theatre del Te, Palazzo del Te, Isola del Te, Mantua: the suspended bank of seating in the auditorium seen from the dais

RIBA158735
Poltronieri, Adolfo
NOTES: This was a conversion of the stable block of the Palazzo del Te (1535 by Giulio Romano) by the architect Adolfo Poltronieri into a lecture theatre. Earlier, in 1984, the same architect had created an exhibitiion gallery in the attic above the vaulted ceilings of the main rooms of the Palazzo. The design of the lecture theatre was largely shaped by the desire to preserve and reveal what existed, in this case, the original brick and pebble floor. Hence the banked seating and stairs have been suspended from the walls above. See RIBA130426 for a black and white version of this image.

Building Design Partnership offices, Sunlight House, Manchester: a meeting room

RIBA158786
Building Design Partnership
NOTES: See RIBA131705 for a black and white version of this image.

Reform Club, Pall Mall, London: the end bay of the drawing room

RIBA158803
Barry, Sir Charles (1795-1860)
NOTES: See RIBA119413 for a black and white version of this image.

Goddards, Abinger Common, Surrey: detail of the skittle alley with seating on the right

RIBA159023
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: Goddards was built (1898-1900) by Sir Edwin Lutyens for Sir Frederick Merrielees as a holiday rest home for 'ladies of small means' on a plot near Pasture Wood (later Beatrice Webb House) where the Merrielees family lived. In 1910 Merrielees commissioned Lutyens to extend Goddards converting it into a single dwelling for his son and his wife. The design of the garden was a joint collaboration with Lutyens and Gertrude Jekyll. See RIBA149424 for a black and white version of this image.

Goddards, Abinger Common, Surrey: detail of the seating in the skittle alley

RIBA159024
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: Goddards was built (1898-1900) by Sir Edwin Lutyens for Sir Frederick Merrielees as a holiday rest home for 'ladies of small means' on a plot near Pasture Wood (later Beatrice Webb House) where the Merrielees family lived. In 1910 Merrielees commissioned Lutyens to extend Goddards converting it into a single dwelling for his son and his wife. The design of the garden was a joint collaboration with Lutyens and Gertrude Jekyll. See RIBA149425 for a black and white version of this image.

Aston Hall, Aston, Birmingham: detail of chairs

RIBA159099
Thorpe, John (c.1565-1655?)
NOTES: See RIBA147994 for a black and white version of this image.

Royal Festival Hall, South Bank, London: the auditorium

RIBA159646
London County Council. Architects Department
NOTES: See RIBA147209 for a black and white version of this image.

Royal Festival Hall, South Bank, London: detail of the boxes in the auditorium

RIBA159647
London County Council. Architects Department
NOTES: See RIBA147210 for a black and white version of this image.

Royal Festival Hall, South Bank, London: the auditorium

RIBA159649
London County Council. Architects Department
NOTES: See RIBA147212 for a black and white version of this image.

Royal Festival Hall, South Bank, London: the auditorium

RIBA159650
London County Council. Architects Department
NOTES: See RIBA147213 for a black and white version of this image.

Royal Festival Hall, South Bank, London: the auditorium looking towards the stage

RIBA159653
London County Council. Architects Department
NOTES: See RIBA147217 for a black and white version of this image.

Uplands Conference Centre, Cryers Hill, High Wycombe: one of the new lecture rooms

RIBA159925
Lamb, Edward Beckitt (1857-1932)
NOTES: Uplands was a country house designed by E. B. Lamb in 1858-1859. In 1956 it was bought by the Cooperative Permanent Building Society (later the Nationwide Building Society) for use as a conference and training centre. A new accommodation block was built alongside the main house in 1958. In 1978 the Nationwide commissioned Edward Cullinan Architects to redevelop the conference centre. The front range of the 1859 house was retained but the service wing and the 1958 building were demolished and replaced, by a new foyer and dining hall, and residential wings. Completed in 1983 the new conference centre opened in May 1984 to mark the Nationwide's centenary celebrations. See RIBA119498 for a black and white version of this image.
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