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Restoration

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Ancient High House, Stafford: the rear elevation showing projecting timber weathering

RIBA133028
F. W. B. & Mary Charles
NOTES: The Ancient High House in Stafford, was a grand timber-framed town house built for the Dorrington family in 1595. The insertion of three shops on the ground floor in 1885 damaged the sandstone plinth and undermined the structure and affected the visual coherence of the whole design. The whole building was restored in four phases from 1976-1986. See RIBA133034 for a colour version of this image.

Ancient High House, Stafford, seen from the nearby roofs

RIBA133029
F. W. B. & Mary Charles
NOTES: The Ancient High House in Stafford, was a grand timber-framed town house built for the Dorrington family in 1595. The insertion of three shops on the ground floor in 1885 damaged the sandstone plinth and undermined the structure and affected the visual coherence of the whole design. The whole building was restored in four phases from 1976-1986.

Ancient High House, Stafford

RIBA133030
F. W. B. & Mary Charles
NOTES: The Ancient High House in Stafford, was a grand timber-framed town house built for the Dorrington family in 1595. The insertion of three shops on the ground floor in 1885 damaged the sandstone plinth and undermined the structure and affected the visual coherence of the whole design. The whole building was restored in four phases from 1976-1986. See RIBA133017 for a black and white version of this image.

Ancient High House, Stafford

RIBA133031
F. W. B. & Mary Charles
NOTES: The Ancient High House in Stafford, was a grand timber-framed town house built for the Dorrington family in 1595. The insertion of three shops on the ground floor in 1885 damaged the sandstone plinth and undermined the structure and affected the visual coherence of the whole design. The whole building was restored in four phases from 1976-1986. See RIBA133018 for a black and white version of this image.

Ancient High House, Stafford

RIBA133032
F. W. B. & Mary Charles
NOTES: The Ancient High House in Stafford, was a grand timber-framed town house built for the Dorrington family in 1595. The insertion of three shops on the ground floor in 1885 damaged the sandstone plinth and undermined the structure and affected the visual coherence of the whole design. The whole building was restored in four phases from 1976-1986. See RIBA133019 for a black and white version of this image.

Ancient High House, Stafford: detail of 18th century wallpaper

RIBA133033
F. W. B. & Mary Charles
NOTES: The Ancient High House in Stafford, was a grand timber-framed town house built for the Dorrington family in 1595. The insertion of three shops on the ground floor in 1885 damaged the sandstone plinth and undermined the structure and affected the visual coherence of the whole design. The whole building was restored in four phases from 1976-1986. See RIBA133023 for a black and white version of this image.

Ancient High House, Stafford: the rear elevation showing projecting timber weathering

RIBA133034
F. W. B. & Mary Charles
NOTES: The Ancient High House in Stafford, was a grand timber-framed town house built for the Dorrington family in 1595. The insertion of three shops on the ground floor in 1885 damaged the sandstone plinth and undermined the structure and affected the visual coherence of the whole design. The whole building was restored in four phases from 1976-1986. See RIBA133028 for a black and white version of this image.

The Bank of England, Threadneedle Street, City of London: the Bank Stock Office

RIBA134111
Soane, Sir John (1753-1837)
NOTES: Soane's Bank Stock Office was demolished in 1925 for Herbert Baker's rebuilding of the whole Bank of England. However, his original design was reconstructed in 1986-1988 as part of the Bank of England Museum.

The Bank of England, Threadneedle Street, City of London: the Bank Stock Office

RIBA134112
Soane, Sir John (1753-1837)
NOTES: Soane's Bank Stock Office was demolished in 1925 for Herbert Baker's rebuilding of the whole Bank of England. However, his original design was reconstructed in 1986-1988 as part of the Bank of England Museum.

Manor House, East Barsham, Norfolk

RIBA136539
Page, John
NOTES: Prior to the early 20th century the house was known as Wolterton Manor. It was built in the 1520s by Sir Henry Fermor whose coat of arms are on the gatehouse. The house fell into ruin in the 18th century and remained so until the first restoration in 1922. This was done by the architect John Page of Holtom & Page, who then went on to substantially reconstruct the Manor in 1936-1938.

Manor House, East Barsham, Norfolk: detail of the chimneys

RIBA136540
Page, John
NOTES: Prior to the early 20th century the house was known as Wolterton Manor. It was built in the 1520s by Sir Henry Fermor whose coat of arms are on the gatehouse. The house fell into ruin in the 18th century and remained so until the first restoration in 1922. This was done by the architect John Page of Holtom & Page, who then went on to substantially reconstruct the Manor in 1936-1938.

Manor House, East Barsham, Norfolk: the gatehouse

RIBA136541
Page, John
NOTES: Prior to the early 20th century the house was known as Wolterton Manor. It was built in the 1520s by Sir Henry Fermor whose coat of arms are on the gatehouse. The house fell into ruin in the 18th century and remained so until the first restoration in 1922. This was done by the architect John Page of Holtom & Page, who then went on to substantially reconstruct the Manor in 1936-1938.
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