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Photograph of paving and drain-cover to accompany an article by Ivor de Wolfe: entitled 'Townscape'

RIBA105536
NOTES: The photograph is likely to be by Ivy de Wolfe. SOURCE: Architectural Review, vol. 106, 1949 Dec. p. 354

Images to accompany an article by Donald Campbell: entitled, 'Municipal Rustic'

RIBA105540
SOURCE: Architectural Review, vol. 112, 1952 Oct., p. 237

Plaque set into the pavement, embossed with the initals SQPR (the Roman Senate & People), with the inscription servizio di innaffiamento, Rome, referring to the city's water supply

RIBA113074
NOTES: This image is one of many taken by Ivy de Wolfe, the pseudonym of Hazel de Cronin Hastings, of Italian subjects. Many of these appeared in the book 'The Italian Townscape' by Ivor de Wolfe (London, Architectural Press, 1963).

Earlshall, Leuchars, Fife: detail of paving

RIBA150419
Lorimer, Sir Robert Stodart (1864-1929)
NOTES: Earlshall is a 16th tower house builit for the Bruces of Earlshall, begun in 1546 and completed in 1617. It was restored in the 1890s by Robert Lorimer, who also laid out the walled garden. See RIBA161401 for a colour version of this image.

Folly Farm, Sulhamstead, Berkshire: the herringbone brickwork paving

RIBA150442
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: Folly Farm was a 17th century farmhouse, which was extended twice by Lutyens in the early 20th century. First, shortly after 1906 by the new owner H.H. Cochrane, who employed Lutyens to enlarge the house for him, and produced a relatively small, dolls-house-like extension in a late 17th century style. He also (with the help of Jekyll), laid out the first phase of the garden in a simple manner, adjacent to the east and south fronts. In 1912 the house was bought by Zachary Merton who also employed Lutyens to extend the house to the west in his `Surrey style'. At the same time a parterre garden was created and a Dutch canal replaced previous tennis courts, with planting advice from Jekyll. See RIBA161458 for a colour version of this image.

Folly Farm, Sulhamstead, Berkshire: detail of the herringbone brickwork paving

RIBA150447
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: Folly Farm was a 17th century farmhouse, which was extended twice by Lutyens in the early 20th century. First, shortly after 1906 by the new owner H.H. Cochrane, who employed Lutyens to enlarge the house for him, and produced a relatively small, dolls-house-like extension in a late 17th century style. He also (with the help of Jekyll), laid out the first phase of the garden in a simple manner, adjacent to the east and south fronts. In 1912 the house was bought by Zachary Merton who also employed Lutyens to extend the house to the west in his `Surrey style'. At the same time a parterre garden was created and a Dutch canal replaced previous tennis courts, with planting advice from Jekyll. See RIBA161461 for a colour version of this image.

Hestercombe House and gardens, Taunton: detail of decorative paving using an old millstone

RIBA150558
Bampfylde, Coplestone Warre (1720-1791)
NOTES: The house dates back to the 17th century but was extensively remodelled in the 18th and 19th centuries. But the house is famous for its gardens. First landscaped in the 1750s by the then owner Coplestone Warre Bampfylde, a landscape designer and amateur painter. Then in 1904, Lutyens with Jekyll responsible for the planting created one of his largest single garden designs, creating a series of paved terraces, raised walks and water features and a grand Orangery of 1906-1908. See RIBA161601 for a colour version of this image.

Hestercombe House and gardens, Taunton: detail of paving

RIBA150566
Bampfylde, Coplestone Warre (1720-1791)
NOTES: The house dates back to the 17th century but was extensively remodelled in the 18th and 19th centuries. But the house is famous for its gardens. First landscaped in the 1750s by the then owner Coplestone Warre Bampfylde, a landscape designer and amateur painter. Then in 1904, Lutyens with Jekyll responsible for the planting created one of his largest single garden designs, creating a series of paved terraces, raised walks and water features and a grand Orangery of 1906-1908. See RIBA161606 for a colour version of this image.

Hestercombe House and gardens, near Taunton: decorative paving using an old millstone

RIBA151272
Bampfylde, Coplestone Warre (1720-1791)
NOTES: The house dates back to the 17th century but was extensively remodelled in the 18th and 19th centuries. But the house is famous for its gardens. First landscaped in the 1750s by the then owner Coplestone Warre Bampfylde, a landscape designer and amateur painter. Then in 1904, Lutyens with Jekyll responsible for the planting created one of his largest single garden designs, creating a series of paved terraces, raised walks and water features and a grand Orangery of 1906-1908.

Folly Farm, Sulhamstead, Berkshire: detail of herringbone brickwork paving

RIBA159790
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: Folly Farm was a 17th century farmhouse, which was extended twice by Lutyens in the early 20th century. First, shortly after 1906 by the new owner H.H. Cochrane, who employed Lutyens to enlarge the house for him, and produced a relatively small, dolls-house-like extension in a late 17th century style. He also (with the help of Jekyll), laid out the first phase of the garden in a simple manner, adjacent to the east and south fronts. In 1912 the house was bought by Zachary Merton who also employed Lutyens to extend the house to the west in his `Surrey style'. At the same time a parterre garden was created and a Dutch canal replaced previous tennis courts, with planting advice from Jekyll.

Earlshall, Leuchars, Fife: detail of paving

RIBA161401
Lorimer, Sir Robert Stodart (1864-1929)
NOTES: Earlshall is a 16th tower house builit for the Bruces of Earlshall, begun in 1546 and completed in 1617. It was restored in the 1890s by Robert Lorimer, who also laid out the walled garden. See RIBA50419 for a black and white version of this image.
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