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Panelling

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BBC Broadcasting House, Portland Place, London: the unfurnished semi-circular Council Chamber lined with Tasmanian oak

RIBA24762
Myer, George Val (1883-1959)
NOTES: Broadcasting House, Portland Place, is the headquarters and registered office of the British Broadcasting Corporation.

Freemasons' Hall, Great Queen Street, London: the processional corridor

RIBA25151
Ashley & Newman
NOTES: This, the third Freemasons' Hall to be built in Queen Anne Street, is both the headquarters of the United Grand Lodge of England and the principal meeting place for Lodges in London. It was built in 1927-1933 as a memorial to the many Freemasons who died on active service during World War I and was initially known as the Masonic Peace Memorial.

Freemasons' Hall, Great Queen Street, London: the boardroom

RIBA25153
Ashley & Newman
NOTES: This, the third Freemasons' Hall to be built in Queen Anne Street, is both the headquarters of the United Grand Lodge of England and the principal meeting place for Lodges in London. It was built in 1927-1933 as a memorial to the many Freemasons who died on active service during World War I and was initially known as the Masonic Peace Memorial.

Water or Lollard's' Tower, Lambeth Palace, London: the Post Room after restoration

RIBA25156
Seely & Paget
NOTES: The Post Room and the upstairs rooms located in Lollards'Tower, built in the 1430s, were originally intended as sleeping apartments. The central octagonal wooden post, after which the room is named, and the panelling were added in the 17th century. This, one of the many of the Palace buildings that suffered greatly from damage by fire and water during World War II, was restored by Seeley and Paget in the 1950s.

The Gateway or Morton's Tower, Lambeth Palace, London: the Painted Room after restoration

RIBA25160
Seely & Paget
NOTES: The tower was built by John Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury, in 1486-1501 and is one of the few surviving examples of the early Tudor style of brick building. This room on the first floor was one of the many in the Palace that suffered greatly from damage by fire and water during World War II and was restored by Seeley and Paget in the 1950s.

Witley Park, near Godalming, Surrey: the living room

RIBA25182
Gwynne, Patrick (1913-2003)
NOTES: Witley Park was commissioned by Mr and Mrs Gerald Bentall and was the largest of Patrick Gwynne's houses. It comprised large living and dining rooms, a master bedroom suite with dressing rooms and private sitting room, four further family and guest bedrooms, a staff flat and an office.

Sissinghurst Castle: the drawing room

RIBA25580
NOTES: This Elizabethan manor house, based on a double courtyard, with a central red-brick tower, was built by Sir Richard Baker in 1560-1570. It was saved from dereliction when Vita Sackville-West and Nigel Nicolson bought Sissinghurst, which included 400 acres of farmland, in 1930.
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