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Central Milton Keynes Shopping Centre, Buckinghamshire

RIBA109654
Milton Keynes Development Corporation. Architects Department
NOTES: Milton Keynes, which incorporated the existing towns of Bletchley, Wolverton and Stony Stratford along with another fifteen villages and farmland in between, was designated a new town in 1967 and planning control was thus taken from elected local authorities and delegated to the Milton Keynes Development Corporation (MKDC).

Central Milton Keynes Shopping Centre, Buckinghamshire: Silbury Boulevard elevation

RIBA109655
Milton Keynes Development Corporation. Architects Department
NOTES: Milton Keynes, which incorporated the existing towns of Bletchley, Wolverton and Stony Stratford along with another fifteen villages and farmland in between, was designated a new town in 1967 and planning control was thus taken from elected local authorities and delegated to the Milton Keynes Development Corporation (MKDC).

Central Milton Keynes Shopping Centre, Buckinghamshire: the south-east elevation seen from the pedestrian footbridge

RIBA109656
Milton Keynes Development Corporation. Architects Department
NOTES: Milton Keynes, which incorporated the existing towns of Bletchley, Wolverton and Stony Stratford along with another fifteen villages and farmland in between, was designated a new town in 1967 and planning control was thus taken from elected local authorities and delegated to the Milton Keynes Development Corporation (MKDC).

Central Milton Keynes Shopping Centre, Buckinghamshire: the north-east elevation

RIBA109657
Milton Keynes Development Corporation. Architects Department
NOTES: Milton Keynes, which incorporated the existing towns of Bletchley, Wolverton and Stony Stratford along with another fifteen villages and farmland in between, was designated a new town in 1967 and planning control was thus taken from elected local authorities and delegated to the Milton Keynes Development Corporation (MKDC).

Modular terraced housing, Netherfield, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire: model of site

RIBA111515
Milton Keynes Development Corporation. Architects Department
NOTES: Milton Keynes, which incorporated the existing towns of Bletchley, Wolverton and Stony Stratford along with another fifteen villages and farmland in between, was designated a new town in 1967 and planning control was thus taken from elected local authorities and delegated to the Milton Keynes Development Corporation (MKDC).

Modular terraced housing, Netherfield, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire: model

RIBA111516
Milton Keynes Development Corporation. Architects Department
NOTES: Milton Keynes, which incorporated the existing towns of Bletchley, Wolverton and Stony Stratford along with another fifteen villages and farmland in between, was designated a new town in 1967 and planning control was thus taken from elected local authorities and delegated to the Milton Keynes Development Corporation (MKDC).

Modular terraced housing, Netherfield, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire

RIBA111517
Milton Keynes Development Corporation. Architects Department
NOTES: Milton Keynes, which incorporated the existing towns of Bletchley, Wolverton and Stony Stratford along with another fifteen villages and farmland in between, was designated a new town in 1967 and planning control was thus taken from elected local authorities and delegated to the Milton Keynes Development Corporation (MKDC).

Housing, Holstein Way, Thamesmead, London

RIBA112874
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: Thamesmead was planned in 1965-1966 as a new town on the riverside marshes of south-east London between Plumstead and Erith. It was scheduled for completion in 1974 but was never fully finished and the projected population of 60,000 for the new town was downgraded to 45,000 by the end of the 1970s. From then around 400 houses were being built annually and by 1982, the population stood at 20,000. Since 2014 the managment and regeneration of the area has come under the aegis of Peabody.

Housing, Thamesmead, London: the linking walkways to the various blocks

RIBA112875
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: Thamesmead was planned in 1965-1966 as a new town on the riverside marshes of south-east London between Plumstead and Erith. It was scheduled for completion in 1974 but was never fully finished and the projected population of 60,000 for the new town was downgraded to 45,000 by the end of the 1970s. From then around 400 houses were being built annually and by 1982, the population stood at 20,000. Since 2014 the managment and regeneration of the area has come under the aegis of Peabody.

Housing, Thamesmead, London: the pedestrian bridge

RIBA112876
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: Thamesmead was planned in 1965-1966 as a new town on the riverside marshes of south-east London between Plumstead and Erith. It was scheduled for completion in 1974 but was never fully finished and the projected population of 60,000 for the new town was downgraded to 45,000 by the end of the 1970s. From then around 400 houses were being built annually and by 1982, the population stood at 20,000. Since 2014 the managment and regeneration of the area has come under the aegis of Peabody.

Housing, Thamesmead, London: a glazed stairtower

RIBA112877
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: Thamesmead was planned in 1965-1966 as a new town on the riverside marshes of south-east London between Plumstead and Erith. It was scheduled for completion in 1974 but was never fully finished and the projected population of 60,000 for the new town was downgraded to 45,000 by the end of the 1970s. From then around 400 houses were being built annually and by 1982, the population stood at 20,000. Since 2014 the managment and regeneration of the area has come under the aegis of Peabody.

Housing, Thamesmead, London, seen from pedestrian bridge

RIBA112878
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: Thamesmead was planned in 1965-1966 as a new town on the riverside marshes of south-east London between Plumstead and Erith. It was scheduled for completion in 1974 but was never fully finished and the projected population of 60,000 for the new town was downgraded to 45,000 by the end of the 1970s. From then around 400 houses were being built annually and by 1982, the population stood at 20,000. Since 2014 the managment and regeneration of the area has come under the aegis of Peabody.
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