Welcome to RIBApix!
You have no items in your basket.
Close
Filters
Search

New towns

View as Grid List
Sort by

Village Centre, New Ash Green, Kent

RIBA15728
Eric Lyons & Partners
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 8: Housing' in Architectural Review, vol. 148, 1970 Sep. This is a Span development. As built the centre comprised 35 shops, a restaurant, six flats, seven studio workshops and 13 garages.

High-rise housing, Thamesmead, Greenwich, London

RIBA15739
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 8: Housing' in Architectural Review, vol. 148, September 1970. Thamesmead was planned in 1965-1966 as a new town on the riverside marshes of south-east London between Plumstead and Erith. It was scheduled for completion in 1974 but was never fully finished and the projected population of 60,000 for the new town was downgraded to 45,000 by the end of the 1970s. From then around 400 houses were being built annually and by 1982, the population stood at 20,000. Since 2014 the managment and regeneration of the area has come under the aegis of Peabody.

Low-rise and high-rise housing, Thamesmead, Greenwich, London

RIBA15740
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 8: Housing' in Architectural Review, vol. 148, September 1970. Thamesmead was planned in 1965-1966 as a new town on the riverside marshes of south-east London between Plumstead and Erith. It was scheduled for completion in 1974 but was never fully finished and the projected population of 60,000 for the new town was downgraded to 45,000 by the end of the 1970s. From then around 400 houses were being built annually and by 1982, the population stood at 20,000. Since 2014 the managment and regeneration of the area has come under the aegis of Peabody.

Children playing in the precinct of low-rise housing, Tavy Bridge, Thamesmead, Greenwich, London

RIBA15741
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 8: Housing' in Architectural Review, vol. 148, September 1970. Thamesmead was planned in 1965-1966 as a new town on the riverside marshes of south-east London between Plumstead and Erith. It was scheduled for completion in 1974 but was never fully finished and the projected population of 60,000 for the new town was downgraded to 45,000 by the end of the 1970s. From then around 400 houses were being built annually and by 1982, the population stood at 20,000. Since 2014 the managment and regeneration of the area has come under the aegis of Peabody.

Gardens precinct of low-rise housing, Hinksey Path, Lesnes, Thamesmead, Greenwich, London

RIBA15742
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 8: Housing' in Architectural Review, vol. 148, September 1970. Thamesmead was planned in 1965-1966 as a new town on the riverside marshes of south-east London between Plumstead and Erith. It was scheduled for completion in 1974 but was never fully finished and the projected population of 60,000 for the new town was downgraded to 45,000 by the end of the 1970s. From then around 400 houses were being built annually and by 1982, the population stood at 20,000. Since 2014 the managment and regeneration of the area has come under the aegis of Peabody.

Low-rise housing,Thamesmead, Greenwich, London

RIBA15743
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 8: Housing' in Architectural Review, vol. 148, September 1970. Thamesmead was planned in 1965-1966 as a new town on the riverside marshes of south-east London between Plumstead and Erith. It was scheduled for completion in 1974 but was never fully finished and the projected population of 60,000 for the new town was downgraded to 45,000 by the end of the 1970s. From then around 400 houses were being built annually and by 1982, the population stood at 20,000. Since 2014 the managment and regeneration of the area has come under the aegis of Peabody.

Masionettes, Coralline Walk, Lesnes, Thamesmead, Greenwich, London: close-up of the balconies

RIBA15744
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 8: Housing' in Architectural Review, vol. 148, September 1970. Thamesmead was planned in 1965-1966 as a new town on the riverside marshes of south-east London between Plumstead and Erith. It was scheduled for completion in 1974 but was never fully finished and the projected population of 60,000 for the new town was downgraded to 45,000 by the end of the 1970s. From then around 400 houses were being built annually and by 1982, the population stood at 20,000. Since 2014 the managment and regeneration of the area has come under the aegis of Peabody.

Low-rise housing, Lensbury Way, Lesnes, Thamesmead, Greenwich, London: a resident relaxing on his balcony

RIBA15745
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 8: Housing' in Architectural Review, vol. 148, September 1970. Thamesmead was planned in 1965-1966 as a new town on the riverside marshes of south-east London between Plumstead and Erith. It was scheduled for completion in 1974 but was never fully finished and the projected population of 60,000 for the new town was downgraded to 45,000 by the end of the 1970s. From then around 400 houses were being built annually and by 1982, the population stood at 20,000. Since 2014 the managment and regeneration of the area has come under the aegis of Peabody.

Low-rise housing, Thamesmead, Greenwich, London: close-up of a rear elevation and back gardens

RIBA15746
Greater London Council. Department of Architecture & Civic Design
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 8: Housing' in Architectural Review, vol. 148, September 1970. Thamesmead was planned in 1965-1966 as a new town on the riverside marshes of south-east London between Plumstead and Erith. It was scheduled for completion in 1974 but was never fully finished and the projected population of 60,000 for the new town was downgraded to 45,000 by the end of the 1970s. From then around 400 houses were being built annually and by 1982, the population stood at 20,000. Since 2014 the managment and regeneration of the area has come under the aegis of Peabody.

Housing at The Brow, Runcorn, Cheshire

RIBA15767
Runcorn Development Corporation Architects Department
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 8: Housing' in Architectural Review, vol. 148, 1970 Sep. Runcorn New Town was designated on 10 April 1964, with the aim of providing housing and jobs for the people of North Merseyside and Liverpool in particular. The Runcorn Development Corporation (RDC) was formally appointed on 30 April 1964 and the draft Master Plan for the New Town was prepared by Arthur Ling and Associates and approved in 1968. The RDC operated until 1981 when it was dissolved and its functions, property, rights and liabilities were transferred to Warrington Development Corporation which was renamed Warrington and Runcorn Development Corporation.

Housing at The Brow, Runcorn, Cheshire

RIBA15768
Runcorn Development Corporation Architects Department
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 8: Housing' in Architectural Review, vol. 148, 1970 Sep. Runcorn New Town was designated on 10 April 1964, with the aim of providing housing and jobs for the people of North Merseyside and Liverpool in particular. The Runcorn Development Corporation (RDC) was formally appointed on 30 April 1964 and the draft Master Plan for the New Town was prepared by Arthur Ling and Associates and approved in 1968. The RDC operated until 1981 when it was dissolved and its functions, property, rights and liabilities were transferred to Warrington Development Corporation which was renamed Warrington and Runcorn Development Corporation.

Housing at Lincoln Way, Corby New Town, Northamptonshire

RIBA15769
Corby Development Corporation Architects Department
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 8: Housing' in Architectural Review, vol. 148, 1970 Sep.
)
CLOSE