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Manplan

RIBApix presents a series of features exploring the Architectural Review's radical assessment of the built environment at the end of the 1960s, MANPLAN.

Looking forward to the new decade ahead in the autumn of 1969 The Architectural Review (AR) paused to examine and evaluate state of the nation through its architecture and planning. This was by way of the publication of ‘Manplan’, a number of special editions of the AR focusing on topics ranging from housing to religion and how well these functioned within society. Manplan was not only a radical, sometimes brutal assessment of the built environment of the day, but today forms a poignant reminder of British life at the end of the sixties. Its stated intention was to take “as its yardstick real needs rather than minimum standards. Hence the title MANPLAN. A plan for human beings with a destiny rather than figures in a table of statistics.” (The Architectural Review, September 1969)

The first edition, Manplan 1, was published in September 1969 with the series ending a year later with Manplan 8. The intended Manplan 9 focusing on Leisure was never published, however the RIBA holds some of the photographer Patrick Ward’s contact sheets.

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Helicopter pilot above an unidentified power station

RIBA62261
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct.

Canada Dock canteen building, Liverpool

RIBA62275
Gerald Beech & Partners
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct.

Scratchwood Services on the M1, Barnet, London

RIBA62287
Garnett Cloughley Blakemore & Associates
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct. These motorway services were renamed London Gateway Services in 1999.

A packed train in rush hour, London

RIBA62294
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct.

Manual shunting at the railway sidings at Rugeley A Power Station, Staffordshire

RIBA62306
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct.

Euston Station, Euston Road, London: passenger sitting in front of the re-sited Britannia sculptural group formerly over a doorway in the Great Hall of the original station now in the Sprig Restaurant and waiting room off the concourse

RIBA62319
Moorcroft, R. L.
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct. This modern complex of buildings replaced the original Euston Station, designed by Philip Hardwick, which opened in 1837 and was demolished in 1961-1962. This modern complex of buildings replaced the original Euston Station, designed by Philip Hardwick, which opened in 1837 and was demolished in 1961-1962.

Euston Station, Euston Road, London: the entrance and plaza

RIBA62321
Moorcroft, R. L.
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct. This modern complex of buildings replaced the original Euston Station, designed by Philip Hardwick, which opened in 1837 and was demolished in 1961-1962.

Euston Station, Euston Road, London: the concourse

RIBA62328
Moorcroft, R. L.
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct. This modern complex of buildings replaced the original Euston Station, designed by Philip Hardwick, which opened in 1837 and was demolished in 1961-1962.

Euston Station, Euston Road, London: waiting on the concourse near the stairs and escalators down to the Underground station

RIBA62338
Moorcroft, R. L.
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct. This modern complex of buildings replaced the original Euston Station, designed by Philip Hardwick, which opened in 1837 and was demolished in 1961-1962.

Euston Station, Euston Road, London: the Sprig Restaurant

RIBA62341
Moorcroft, R. L.
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct. This modern complex of buildings replaced the original Euston Station, designed by Philip Hardwick, which opened in 1837 and was demolished in 1961-1962.

Queen Street Station, West George Street, Glasgow: ticket barrier at platform 7

RIBA62354
Carsewell, James
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct. The High Level train shed roof was designed by James Carsewell (1878-1880).

Terminal 1, Heathrow Airport, London: car/taxi/coach drop off area

RIBA62366
Frederick Gibberd & Partners
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct.

Terminal 1, Heathrow Airport, London: public telephone area on the concourse

RIBA62379
Conran, Sir Terence Orby (1931-)
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct. The telephone kiosks and telephone book carousels were designed by Terence Conran.

Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, Haarlemmermeer near Amsterdam

RIBA62411
Duintjer, Marius Frans (1908-1983)
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct.

Jumbo jet hangar under construction, Heathrow Airport, London: maintenance area

RIBA62446
Royce Topping Hurley & Stewart
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct.

Boadicea House (BOAC computer building), Heathrow Airport, London

RIBA62458
Gollins Melvin Ward & Partners
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct. BOAC is an acronym for British Overseas Airways Corporation which was the British state airline from 1939 until 1946 and the long-haul British state airline from 1946 to 1974.

Woolsington Airport, Newcastle-upon-Tyne: boarding a plane

RIBA62478
Yorke Rosenberg & Mardall
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct.

BOAC Vickers VC-10 airliner at Heathrow Airport, London

RIBA62489
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct.

Planes at Heathrow Airport, London

RIBA62495
Frederick Gibberd & Partners
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 2: Society is its contacts (travel and communication)' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Oct.

Labour Exchange, Jarrow, Tyneside

RIBA62498
NOTES: This is one of the images taken for 'Manplan 3: Town Workshop' in Architectural Review, vol. 146, 1969 Nov.
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