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Tower of St John's Church, Wapping, London, with the Turk's Head public house on the left, seen from the churchyard

RIBA116638
Johnson, Joel (1721-1799)
NOTES: Only the tower and the shell of this church, the former parish church of Wapping, survived the bombing during World War II. The tower with its Baroque style cupola was restored in 1964 by the London County Council. The rest of the church was converted into flats in the late 1990s. See RIBA116647 for a colour version of this image.

Tower of St John's Church, Wapping, London, with the Turk's Head public house on the left, seen from the churchyard

RIBA116647
Johnson, Joel (1721-1799)
NOTES: Only the tower and the shell of this church, the former parish church of Wapping, survived the bombing during World War II. The tower with its Baroque style cupola was restored in 1964 by the London County Council. The rest of the church was converted into flats in the late 1990s. See RIBA116638 for a black and white version of this image.

Building at the corner of Pages Walk and Grange Road, Bermondsey, seen from Samson's public house on the corner of Griggs Place and Grange Road

RIBA116921
NOTES: This is a cladding in mirror glass of an earlier buildling, probably from the 1950s or 1960s. See RIBA116922 for a colour version of this image.

Building at the corner of Pages Walk and Grange Road, Bermondsey, seen from Samson's public house on the corner of Griggs Place and Grange Road

RIBA116922
NOTES: This is a cladding in mirror glass of an earlier buildling, probably from the 1950s or 1960s. See RIBA116921 for a black and white version of this image.

The Tabard, Bath Road, Bedford Park, Turnham Green, London

RIBA117306
Shaw, Richard Norman (1831-1912)

Bowring House office development, Tower Place, Tower Hill, London: the lower level south side with the Tiger Tavern

RIBA121802
George Trew Dunn
NOTES: This development, sited west of the Tower of London and north of Lower Thames Street consists of offices, shops, restaurant and a public house.

Stag Brewery Site, Victoria Street, Westminster, London: view from the forecourt of Eland House looking across Bressenden Place to Carrier House and The Stag pub

RIBA122472
City of London Real Property Co. Architects' Department
NOTES: The Stag Brewery site was a development from 1962-1963 of largely office buildings and some residential accommodation to the north of Victoria Street, Westminster. Its name comes from the Watney Mann brewery which stood on the site. The resulting buildings were designed by various architects and included a pedestrian square, Stag Place. It has since been rebuilt in the late 1990s early 2000s. Carrier House seen behind the Stag pub was designed by the City of London Real Property Co. Architects' Department.

Stag Brewery Site, Victoria Street, Westminster, London: looking down Bressenden Place with the Stag pub and Carrier House on the left and Eland House on the right

RIBA122473
City of London Real Property Co. Architects' Department
NOTES: The Stag Brewery site was a development from 1962-1963 of largely office buildings and some residential accommodation to the north of Victoria Street, Westminster. Its name comes from the Watney Mann brewery which stood on the site. The resulting buildings were designed by various architects and included a pedestrian square, Stag Place. It has since been rebuilt in the late 1990s early 2000s. Carrier House was by the City of London Real Property Co. Architects' Department and Eland House by Howard Fairbairn & Partners.

Design for a poster for the Central Liquor Control Board entitled 'The Early Bird Catches the Worm' to decorate a pub or canteen, possibly in the Carlisle area

RIBA125804
Voysey, Charles Francis Annesley (1857-1941)
NOTES: This desgin is reminiscent of one for a paper case dated 1896.

Designs for Chrisp Street Market, Lansbury, Poplar, London: roof plan and elevation of the Festival Inn

RIBA126483
Gibberd, Sir Frederick (1908-1984)
NOTES: Gibberd's designs for Chrisp Street Market were part of a larger post-war redevelopment scheme for East London. Having been approached to be the lead architect for the Festival of Britain's South Bank, Gibberd declined, and proposed that an area of East London be rebuilt as a 'Live Architecture' exhibition to run alongside the Festival. The post-war Stepney-Poplar area of London had been divided into eleven neighbourhoods, one of which, Lansbury, was given over to Gibberd's proposal.
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