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Imperial Palace, Kyoto: inside the Shishinden compound looking towards the Shishinden Hall, with the Nikkamon Gate on the far right

RIBA135725
NOTES: The present building dates from 1855, but attempts to reproduce the style of the original palace, which dates back to the 12th century. Like many wooden buildings in Japan, it was destroyed by fire and rebuilt several times over the course of its history.

Imperial Palace, Kyoto: the Shunkoden (Sacred Mirror Hall)

RIBA135727
NOTES: The present building dates from 1855, but attempts to reproduce the style of the original palace, which dates back to the 12th century. Like many wooden buildings in Japan, it was destroyed by fire and rebuilt several times over the course of its history.

Imperial Palace, Kyoto: the Shishinden Hall (Sacred Mirror Hall)

RIBA135728
NOTES: The present building dates from 1855, but attempts to reproduce the style of the original palace, which dates back to the 12th century. Like many wooden buildings in Japan, it was destroyed by fire and rebuilt several times over the course of its history.

Imperial Palace, Kyoto: detail of the Seiryoden Hall (Hall for Rites and Rituals)

RIBA135732
NOTES: The present building dates from 1855, but attempts to reproduce the style of the original palace, which dates back to the 12th century. Like many wooden buildings in Japan, it was destroyed by fire and rebuilt several times over the course of its history.

Sumiyoshi-taisha (Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine), Osaka: two of the four main shrine buildings, built in the Sumiyoshi-zukuri style, with two prayer halls at right angles

RIBA135733
NOTES: The original shrine was founded in the 3rd century, but the current buildings date back to the early nineteenth century. It has been rebuilt in the Sumiyoshi-zukuri style which was the characteristic architecture of the Shinto shrines which predate the arrival of Buddhism in Japan. They were constructed like ancient dwellings, of timber with pitched and gabled roofs, thatched with reed or cypress bark. The prayer halls are of a different style.

Sumiyoshi-taisha (Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine), Osaka: two of the four main shrine buildings, built in the Sumiyoshi-zukuri style, with the two prayer halls at right angles

RIBA135734
NOTES: The original shrine was founded in the 3rd century, but the current buildings date back to the early nineteenth century. It has been rebuilt in the Sumiyoshi-zukuri style which was the characteristic architecture of the Shinto shrines which predate the arrival of Buddhism in Japan. They were constructed like ancient dwellings, of timber with pitched and gabled roofs, thatched with reed or cypress bark. The prayer halls are of a different style.

Sumiyoshi-taisha (Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine), Osaka: two of the four main shrine buildings, built in the Sumiyoshi-zukuri style, with two prayer halls at right angles at the rear of the site

RIBA135735
NOTES: The original shrine was founded in the 3rd century, but the current buildings date back to the early nineteenth century. It has been rebuilt in the Sumiyoshi-zukuri style which was the characteristic architecture of the Shinto shrines which predate the arrival of Buddhism in Japan. They were constructed like ancient dwellings, of timber with pitched and gabled roofs, thatched with reed or cypress bark. The prayer halls are of a different style.

Sumiyoshi-taisha (Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine), Osaka: the prayer halls

RIBA135737
NOTES: The original shrine was founded in the 3rd century, but the current buildings date back to the early nineteenth century. It has been rebuilt in the Sumiyoshi-zukuri style which was the characteristic architecture of the Shinto shrines which predate the arrival of Buddhism in Japan. They were constructed like ancient dwellings, of timber with pitched and gabled roofs, thatched with reed or cypress bark. The prayer halls are of a different style.

Sumiyoshi-taisha (Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine), Osaka: one of the prayer halls

RIBA135738
NOTES: The original shrine was founded in the 3rd century, but the current buildings date back to the early nineteenth century. It has been rebuilt in the Sumiyoshi-zukuri style which was the characteristic architecture of the Shinto shrines which predate the arrival of Buddhism in Japan. They were constructed like ancient dwellings, of timber with pitched and gabled roofs, thatched with reed or cypress bark. The prayer halls are of a different style.
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