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Southwark Bridge, London: detail of one of the granite piers

RIBA102683
Ernest George & Yeates
NOTES: Mott Hay & Handerson were the engineers for the bridge, which replaced Rennie's original of 1814-1819. Ernest George was responsible for the architectural treatment, such as the granite piers, the pedestrian alcove and other embellishments. Construction began in 1913 and the bridge was opened by King George V on 6 June 1921.

Southwark Bridge, London

RIBA102684
Ernest George & Yeates
NOTES: Mott Hay & Handerson were the engineers for the bridge, which replaced Rennie's original of 1814-1819. Ernest George was responsible for the architectural treatment, such as the granite piers, the pedestrian alcove and other embellishments. Construction began in 1913 and the bridge was opened by King George V on 6 June 1921.

Southwark Bridge, London

RIBA102685
Ernest George & Yeates
NOTES: Mott Hay & Handerson were the engineers for the bridge, which replaced Rennie's original of 1814-1819. Ernest George was responsible for the architectural treatment, such as the granite piers, the pedestrian alcove and other embellishments. Construction began in 1913 and the bridge was opened by King George V on 6 June 1921.

Southwark Bridge, London: one of the granite piers

RIBA102686
Ernest George & Yeates
NOTES: Mott Hay & Handerson were the engineers for the bridge, which replaced Rennie's original of 1814-1819. Ernest George was responsible for the architectural treatment, such as the granite piers, the pedestrian alcove and other embellishments. Construction began in 1913 and the bridge was opened by King George V on 6 June 1921.

Southwark Bridge, London

RIBA102687
Ernest George & Yeates
NOTES: Mott Hay & Handerson were the engineers for the bridge, which replaced Rennie's original of 1814-1819. Ernest George was responsible for the architectural treatment, such as the granite piers, the pedestrian alcove and other embellishments. Construction began in 1913 and the bridge was opened by King George V on 6 June 1921.

Southwark Bridge, London with the dome of St Paul's Cathedral behind

RIBA102688
Ernest George & Yeates
NOTES: Mott Hay & Handerson were the engineers for the bridge, which replaced Rennie's original of 1814-1819. Ernest George was responsible for the architectural treatment, such as the granite piers, the pedestrian alcove and other embellishments. Construction began in 1913 and the bridge was opened by King George V on 6 June 1921.

Southwark Bridge, London, with the dome of St Paul's Cathdedral behind

RIBA102689
Ernest George & Yeates
NOTES: Mott Hay & Handerson were the engineers for the bridge, which replaced Rennie's original of 1814-1819. Ernest George was responsible for the architectural treatment, such as the granite piers, the pedestrian alcove and other embellishments. Construction began in 1913 and the bridge was opened by King George V on 6 June 1921.

Southwark Bridge, London, with the dome of St Paul's Cathedral behind

RIBA102690
Ernest George & Yeates
NOTES: Mott Hay & Handerson were the engineers for the bridge, which replaced Rennie's original of 1814-1819. Ernest George was responsible for the architectural treatment, such as the granite piers, the pedestrian alcove and other embellishments. Construction began in 1913 and the bridge was opened by King George V on 6 June 1921.

Unexecuted design for the Mansion House Square scheme, entitled 'Updated/Preferred Scheme and Rider Plans', 1 Poultry, City of London for Peter Palumbo: exterior granite details

RIBA106925
Mies van der Rohe, Ludwig (1886-1969)
NOTES: The original scheme dates from 1967. In 1969 planning permission was promised pending the complete acquisition of the site by the developer. However, by the time Palumbo was ready to resubmit his plans, the Bank area had become a designated conservation area and many of the Victorian buildings that the scheme proposed to replace had been listed. In 1982 the scheme was refused consent. This was the 'Updated/Preferred Scheme', produced after Mies's death by William Holford & Partners in 1984, and submitted to the City Architect and Planning Officer on 5 March that year.

Pohjola Insurance Company, Aleksanterinkatu 44, Helsinki

RIBA108420
Gesellius, Herman (1874-1916)
NOTES: Pohjola was the first fire insurance building in Finland and the first to be constructed of fire-resistant materials (ie native stone - granite). It was also the first true National Romantic building by the architectural trio of Gesellius, Lindgren and Saarinen. The majority of the sculptural work on the building is by Hilda Flodin.

Pohjola Insurance Company, Aleksanterinkatu 44, Helsinki: the main entrance

RIBA108505
Gesellius, Herman (1874-1916)
NOTES: Pohjola was the first fire insurance building in Finland and the first to be constructed of fire-resistant materials (ie native stone - granite). It was also the first true National Romantic building by the architectural trio of Gesellius, Lindgren and Saarinen. The majority of the sculptural work on the building is by Hilda Flodin.
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