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Gardens

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Orangery, Margam, Glamorgan

RIBA148835
Keck, Anthony (1726-1797)
NOTES: Built in the grounds of the former Margam monastery, the orangery at a length of 327 ft (99.67 metres) was longer and larger than any other in Great Britain at the time. See RIBA148830 for a black and version version of this image.

Pallant House, North Pallant, Chichester: detail of gardens

RIBA149058
NOTES: See RIBA157102 for a colour version of this image.

Rousham Park, Oxfordshire: the Townesend building

RIBA149112
Kent, William (1685?-1748)
NOTES: Rousham is a 17th century country house with pleasure grounds laid out to designs by Charles Bridgeman in the 1720s. It was then landscaped, modified and extended by William Kent, 1737-1741. It is the most complete surviving example of Kent's landscape work. See RIBA157152 for a colour version of this image.

Rousham Park, Oxfordshire: the Townesend building

RIBA149113
Kent, William (1685?-1748)
NOTES: Rousham is a 17th century country house with pleasure grounds laid out to designs by Charles Bridgeman in the 1720s. It was then landscaped, modified and extended by William Kent, 1737-1741. It is the most complete surviving example of Kent's landscape work. See RIBA157153 for a colour version of this image.

Rousham Park, Oxfordshire: Kent's Palladian gate leading to the paddock, with urn in the foreground

RIBA149114
Kent, William (1685?-1748)
NOTES: Rousham is a 17th century country house with pleasure grounds laid out to designs by Charles Bridgeman in the 1720s. It was then landscaped, modified and extended by William Kent, 1737-1741. It is the most complete surviving example of Kent's landscape work. See RIBA157154 for a colour version of this image.

Rousham Park, Oxfordshire: Kent's Palladian gate leading to the paddock

RIBA149115
Kent, William (1685?-1748)
NOTES: Rousham is a 17th century country house with pleasure grounds laid out to designs by Charles Bridgeman in the 1720s. It was then landscaped, modified and extended by William Kent, 1737-1741. It is the most complete surviving example of Kent's landscape work. See RIBA157155 for a colour version of this image.

Rousham Park, Oxfordshire: one of the lodges

RIBA149116
Kent, William (1685?-1748)
NOTES: Rousham is a 17th century country house with pleasure grounds laid out to designs by Charles Bridgeman in the 1720s. It was then landscaped, modified and extended by William Kent, 1737-1741. It is the most complete surviving example of Kent's landscape work. See RIBA157156 for a colour version of this image.

Rousham Park, Oxfordshire: one of the lodges

RIBA149117
Kent, William (1685?-1748)
NOTES: Rousham is a 17th century country house with pleasure grounds laid out to designs by Charles Bridgeman in the 1720s. It was then landscaped, modified and extended by William Kent, 1737-1741. It is the most complete surviving example of Kent's landscape work. See RIBA157157 for a colour version of this image.

Channel 4 headquarters, Horseferry Road, London: the garden at the rear

RIBA149250
Richard Rogers Partnership
NOTES: See RIBA155793 for a colour version of this image.

Goddards, Abinger Common, Surrey: the garden with the dipping well in the foreground

RIBA149404
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: Goddards was built (1898-1900) by Sir Edwin Lutyens for Sir Frederick Merrielees as a holiday rest home for 'ladies of small means' on a plot near Pasture Wood (later Beatrice Webb House) where the Merrielees family lived. In 1910 Merrielees commissioned Lutyens to extend Goddards converting it into a single dwelling for his son and his wife. The design of the garden was a joint collaboration with Lutyens and Gertrude Jekyll. See RIBA159005 for a colour version of this image.

Goddards, Abinger Common, Surrey: the garden with the dipping well in the foreground

RIBA149413
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: Goddards was built (1898-1900) by Sir Edwin Lutyens for Sir Frederick Merrielees as a holiday rest home for 'ladies of small means' on a plot near Pasture Wood (later Beatrice Webb House) where the Merrielees family lived. In 1910 Merrielees commissioned Lutyens to extend Goddards converting it into a single dwelling for his son and his wife. The design of the garden was a joint collaboration with Lutyens and Gertrude Jekyll. See RIBA159013 for a colour version of this image.
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