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Hidcote Manor Gardens, Chipping Camden: the gardens under snow, looking towards the gazebo

RIBA161447
Johnston, Lawrence (1871-1958)
NOTES: The gardens at Hidcote Manor (a late 17th century building, refaced in the 18th century with 20th century additions) were laid out between 1907 and 1930 by the garden designer Lawrence Johnston, whose mother had acquired the estate in 1907. See RIBA150578 for a black and white version of this image.

Hidcote Manor Gardens, Chipping Camden: the 18th century gateway

RIBA161448
Johnston, Lawrence (1871-1958)
NOTES: The gardens at Hidcote Manor (a late 17th century building, refaced in the 18th century with 20th century additions) were laid out between 1907 and 1930 by the garden designer Lawrence Johnston, whose mother had acquired the estate in 1907. See RIBA150579 for a black and white version of this image.

Hidcote Manor Gardens, Chipping Camden: one of the gazebos

RIBA161449
Johnston, Lawrence (1871-1958)
NOTES: The gardens at Hidcote Manor (a late 17th century building, refaced in the 18th century with 20th century additions) were laid out between 1907 and 1930 by the garden designer Lawrence Johnston, whose mother had acquired the estate in 1907. See RIBA150581 for a black and white version of this image.

Hidcote Manor Gardens, Chipping Camden: the gardens under snow

RIBA161450
Johnston, Lawrence (1871-1958)
NOTES: The gardens at Hidcote Manor (a late 17th century building, refaced in the 18th century with 20th century additions) were laid out between 1907 and 1930 by the garden designer Lawrence Johnston, whose mother had acquired the estate in 1907. See RIBA150582 for a black and white version of this image.

Hidcote Manor Gardens, Chipping Camden; the gardens under snow

RIBA161451
Johnston, Lawrence (1871-1958)
NOTES: The gardens at Hidcote Manor (a late 17th century building, refaced in the 18th century with 20th century additions) were laid out between 1907 and 1930 by the garden designer Lawrence Johnston, whose mother had acquired the estate in 1907. See RIBA150583 for a black and white version of this image.

Hidcote Manor Gardens, Chipping Camden: the landscape under snow

RIBA161452
Johnston, Lawrence (1871-1958)
NOTES: The gardens at Hidcote Manor (a late 17th century building, refaced in the 18th century with 20th century additions) were laid out between 1907 and 1930 by the garden designer Lawrence Johnston, whose mother had acquired the estate in 1907. See RIBA150585 for a black and white version of this image.

Hidcote Manor Gardens, Chipping Camden: the gardens looking towards the topiary hedge

RIBA161453
Johnston, Lawrence (1871-1958)
NOTES: The gardens at Hidcote Manor (a late 17th century building, refaced in the 18th century with 20th century additions) were laid out between 1907 and 1930 by the garden designer Lawrence Johnston, whose mother had acquired the estate in 1907. See RIBA150586 for a black and white version of this image.

Hidcote Manor Gardens, Chipping Camden: the topiary garden

RIBA161454
Johnston, Lawrence (1871-1958)
NOTES: The gardens at Hidcote Manor (a late 17th century building, refaced in the 18th century with 20th century additions) were laid out between 1907 and 1930 by the garden designer Lawrence Johnston, whose mother had acquired the estate in 1907. See RIBA150587 for a black and white version of this image.

Folly Farm, Sulhamstead, Berkshire: the Dutch canal

RIBA161455
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: Folly Farm was a 17th century farmhouse, which was extended twice by Lutyens in the early 20th century. First, shortly after 1906 by the new owner H.H. Cochrane, who employed Lutyens to enlarge the house for him, and produced a relatively small, dolls-house-like extension in a late 17th century style. He also (with the help of Jekyll), laid out the first phase of the garden in a simple manner, adjacent to the east and south fronts. In 1912 the house was bought by Zachary Merton who also employed Lutyens to extend the house to the west in his `Surrey style'. At the same time a parterre garden was created and a Dutch canal replaced previous tennis courts, with planting advice from Jekyll. See RIBA150439 for a black and white version of this image.

Folly Farm, Sulhamstead, Berkshire: the sunken rose garden

RIBA161456
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: Folly Farm was a 17th century farmhouse, which was extended twice by Lutyens in the early 20th century. First, shortly after 1906 by the new owner H.H. Cochrane, who employed Lutyens to enlarge the house for him, and produced a relatively small, dolls-house-like extension in a late 17th century style. He also (with the help of Jekyll), laid out the first phase of the garden in a simple manner, adjacent to the east and south fronts. In 1912 the house was bought by Zachary Merton who also employed Lutyens to extend the house to the west in his `Surrey style'. At the same time a parterre garden was created and a Dutch canal replaced previous tennis courts, with planting advice from Jekyll. See RIBA150440 for a black and white version of this image.

Folly Farm, Sulhamstead, Berkshire: the gardens

RIBA161457
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: Folly Farm was a 17th century farmhouse, which was extended twice by Lutyens in the early 20th century. First, shortly after 1906 by the new owner H.H. Cochrane, who employed Lutyens to enlarge the house for him, and produced a relatively small, dolls-house-like extension in a late 17th century style. He also (with the help of Jekyll), laid out the first phase of the garden in a simple manner, adjacent to the east and south fronts. In 1912 the house was bought by Zachary Merton who also employed Lutyens to extend the house to the west in his `Surrey style'. At the same time a parterre garden was created and a Dutch canal replaced previous tennis courts, with planting advice from Jekyll. See RIBA150441 for a black and white version of this image.

Folly Farm, Sulhamstead, Berkshire: the herringbone brickwork paving

RIBA161458
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: Folly Farm was a 17th century farmhouse, which was extended twice by Lutyens in the early 20th century. First, shortly after 1906 by the new owner H.H. Cochrane, who employed Lutyens to enlarge the house for him, and produced a relatively small, dolls-house-like extension in a late 17th century style. He also (with the help of Jekyll), laid out the first phase of the garden in a simple manner, adjacent to the east and south fronts. In 1912 the house was bought by Zachary Merton who also employed Lutyens to extend the house to the west in his `Surrey style'. At the same time a parterre garden was created and a Dutch canal replaced previous tennis courts, with planting advice from Jekyll. See RIBA150442 for a black and white version of this image.
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