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Mary Ward Settlement (Passmore Edwards Settlement Buildings), Tavistock Place, London: the hall, looking west to the main entrance

RIBA134786
Smith & Brewer
NOTES: The Mary Ward Settlement (originally known as the Passmore Edwards Settlement Buildings) was founded in the 1890s by Mary Augusta Ward under the financial patronage of John Passmore Edwards. It aimed to provide facilities to 'improve the the religious, moral, intellectual or physical well-being of the people of London' and was also notable for housing the first fully equipped classrooms for children with disabilities. See RIBA155150 for a colour version of this image.

Mary Ward Settlement (Passmore Edwards Settlement Buildings), Tavistock Place, London: side view of the main entrance porch

RIBA134801
Smith & Brewer
NOTES: The Mary Ward Settlement (originally known as the Passmore Edwards Settlement Buildings) was founded in the 1890s by Mary Augusta Ward under the financial patronage of John Passmore Edwards. It aimed to provide facilities to 'improve the the religious, moral, intellectual or physical well-being of the people of London' and was also notable for housing the first fully equipped classrooms for children with disabilities.

Mary Ward Settlement (Passmore Edwards Settlement Buildings), Tavistock Place, London: residents' entrance to the building

RIBA134802
Smith & Brewer
NOTES: The Mary Ward Settlement (originally known as the Passmore Edwards Settlement Buildings) was founded in the 1890s by Mary Augusta Ward under the financial patronage of John Passmore Edwards. It aimed to provide facilities to 'improve the the religious, moral, intellectual or physical well-being of the people of London' and was also notable for housing the first fully equipped classrooms for children with disabilities.

Mary Ward Settlement (Passmore Edwards Settlement Buildings), Tavistock Place, London: main entrance porch and main entrance to hall (left)

RIBA134803
Smith & Brewer
NOTES: The Mary Ward Settlement (originally known as the Passmore Edwards Settlement Buildings) was founded in the 1890s by Mary Augusta Ward under the financial patronage of John Passmore Edwards. It aimed to provide facilities to 'improve the the religious, moral, intellectual or physical well-being of the people of London' and was also notable for housing the first fully equipped classrooms for children with disabilities. See RIBA155155 for a colour version of this image.

North London Blood Transfusion Centre, Colindale Hospital, London: detail of the main entrance

RIBA134824
Design Team Partnership
NOTES: See RIBA134835 for a colour version of this image.

North London Blood Transfusion Centre, Colindale Hospital, London: detail of the main entrance

RIBA134835
Design Team Partnership
NOTES: See RIBA134824 for a black and white version of this image.

Queen Mary University College Library, Mile End Road, London: one of the library entrances

RIBA134854
Colin St John Wilson & Partners
NOTES: See RIBA157762 for a colour version of this image.

Former Refuge Assurance offices, Oxford Street, Manchester: the main entrance

RIBA134960
Waterhouse, Alfred (1830-1905)
NOTES: The former Refuge Assurance Offices, now the Palace Hotel was built in three phases. No.1 building by Alfed Waterhouse at the corner of Whitfield Street and Oxford Street, with the entrance on the corner is 1891-1895; the No. 2 building is the extension along Oxford Street by his son Paul, built 1910-1912. It is linked to the No. 1 building by the clock tower which sits over the new entrance. The No. 3 building (not seen) is behind the No. 1 building along Whitworth Street and dates from 1932, by the architect Stanley Birkett.

Former Refuge Assurance offices, Oxford Street, Manchester: the entrance under the clock tower

RIBA134982
Waterhouse, Alfred (1830-1905)
NOTES: The former Refuge Assurance Offices, now the Palace Hotel was built in three phases. No.1 building by Alfed Waterhouse at the corner of Whitfield Street and Oxford Street, with the entrance on the corner is 1891-1895; the No. 2 building is the extension along Oxford Street by his son Paul, built 1910-1912. It is linked to the No. 1 building by the clock tower which sits over the new entrance. The No. 3 building (not seen) is behind the No. 1 building along Whitworth Street and dates from 1932, by the architect Stanley Birkett. See RIBA134993 for a colour version of this image.

Former Refuge Assurance offices, Oxford Street, Manchester: the corner entrance on Whitworth Street

RIBA134988
Waterhouse, Alfred (1830-1905)
NOTES: The former Refuge Assurance Offices, now the Palace Hotel was built in three phases. No.1 building by Alfed Waterhouse at the corner of Whitfield Street and Oxford Street, with the entrance on the corner is 1891-1895; the No. 2 building is the extension along Oxford Street by his son Paul, built 1910-1912. It is linked to the No. 1 building by the clock tower which sits over the new entrance. The No. 3 bulding (not seen) is behind the No. 1 building along Whitworth Street and dates from 1932, by the architect Stanley Birkett.

Former Refuge Assurance offices, Oxford Street, Manchester: the clerks entrance on Whitworth Street

RIBA134990
Waterhouse, Alfred (1830-1905)
NOTES: The former Refuge Assurance Offices, now the Palace Hotel was built in three phases. No.1 building by Alfed Waterhouse at the corner of Whitfield Street and Oxford Street, with the entrance on the corner is 1891-1895; the No. 2 building is the extension along Oxford Street by his son Paul, built 1910-1912. It is linked to the No. 1 building by the clock tower which sits over the new entrance. The No. 3 bulding (not seen) is behind the No. 1 building along Whitworth Street and dates from 1932, by the architect Stanley Birkett.

Academy Cinema, Oxford Street, London: the main entrance

RIBA135001
MacDonald, Alister G. (1898-1993)
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