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Door furniture

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Pallant House, North Pallant, Chichester: detail of door lock

RIBA149065
NOTES: See RIBA157108 for a colour version of this image.

Prickshaw Village, Broadley, Lancashire: detail of door knocker

RIBA149107
Deakin, Tony
NOTES: Prickshaw Village is a stone-built hamlet on the Pennines, which housed a thriving textile community in the early and mid-19th century. It became derelict in the 1960s, but was brought back to life in 1989 by Rochdale Borough Council, who comissioned a firm of local builders, who in turn commissioned the architect Tony Deakin. It was given a Civic Trust award in 1994, for the sensitivity of the restoration in 1994.

Goddards, Abinger Common, Surrey: detail of door furniture designed by Lutyens

RIBA149456
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: Goddards was built (1898-1900) by Sir Edwin Lutyens for Sir Frederick Merrielees as a holiday rest home for 'ladies of small means' on a plot near Pasture Wood (later Beatrice Webb House) where the Merrielees family lived. In 1910 Merrielees commissioned Lutyens to extend Goddards converting it into a single dwelling for his son and his wife. The design of the garden was a joint collaboration with Lutyens and Gertrude Jekyll. See RIBA159048 for a colour version of this image.

Goddards, Abinger Common, Surrey: detail of door furniture designed by Lutyens

RIBA149457
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: Goddards was built (1898-1900) by Sir Edwin Lutyens for Sir Frederick Merrielees as a holiday rest home for 'ladies of small means' on a plot near Pasture Wood (later Beatrice Webb House) where the Merrielees family lived. In 1910 Merrielees commissioned Lutyens to extend Goddards converting it into a single dwelling for his son and his wife. The design of the garden was a joint collaboration with Lutyens and Gertrude Jekyll. See RIBA159049 for a colour version of this image.

Hollybank, Chorleywood, Hertfordshire: detail of heart-shaped key and lock

RIBA149477
Voysey, Charles Francis Annesley (1857-1941)
NOTES: See RIBA156470 for a colour version of this image.

Perrycroft, Jubilee Drive, Colwall, Herefordshire: detail of front door hinge

RIBA149644
Voysey, Charles Francis Annesley (1857-1941)
NOTES: See RIBA156781 for a colour version of this image.

An Elsley display-board showing their 'designer range' of Voysey metalwork

RIBA149716
Voysey, Charles Francis Annesley (1857-1941)
NOTES: These items are from the collection of Lady Joan Slack (1925-2015), a prominent geneticist, who inherited through her family a number of artifacts from the Voysey family, which she subsequently catalogued. She lived at Bridgwater, Somerset, where these images were taken. Thomas Elsley & Co were the manufacturers of Voysey's metalwork.

The Homestead, Second Avenue, Frinton-on-Sea, Essex: detail of the main front door

RIBA151619
Voysey, Charles Francis Annesley (1857-1941)
NOTES: The house and all its furniture were designed by Voysey as a holiday home for Sydney Claridge Turner. See RIBA161525 for a colour version of this image.

The Homestead, Second Avenue, Frinton-on-Sea, Essex: detail of heart-shaped letterbox

RIBA151623
Voysey, Charles Francis Annesley (1857-1941)
NOTES: The house and all its furniture were designed by Voysey as a holiday home for Sydney Claridge Turner. See RIBA161529 for a colour version of this image.

Munstead Wood, Godalming: detail of door leading to the hallway with balustrade behind

RIBA153017
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: See RIBA156335 for a colour version of this image.

Munstead Wood, Godalming: detail of door leading into the stair hall

RIBA153018
Lutyens, Sir Edwin Landseer (1869-1944)
NOTES: See RIBA156336 for a colour version of this image.

Mary Ward Settlement (Passmore Edwards Settlement Buildings), Tavistock Place, London: detail of library door plate with the monogram of Thomas Hill Green

RIBA155154
Smith & Brewer
NOTES: The Mary Ward Settlement (originally known as the Passmore Edwards Settlement Buildings) was founded in the 1890s by Mary Augusta Ward under the financial patronage of John Passmore Edwards. It aimed to provide facilities to 'improve the the religious, moral, intellectual or physical well-being of the people of London' and was also notable for housing the first fully equipped classrooms for children with disabilities. See RIBA134800 for a black and white version of this image.
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