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Louvre, Paris: the east facade under construction showing the scaffolding and machinery used to raise the stonework of the pediment

RIBA16777
Le Vau, Louis (1612-1670)
SOURCE: Cabinet du roi, Plans, elevations et vues des chasteaux du Louvre et des Tuileries (Paris, 1727), 2nd unnumbered plate

Structure of a crane

RIBA18751
SOURCE: William Bailey. The advancement of arts, manufactures, and commerce (London, 1776), book VII, chapter III, pl. 1

Topographical drawing of the ruins of St. Mildred's Church, Bread Street, London, surrounded by bomb damaged buildings with a demolition crane in the foreground

RIBA20271
Wren, Sir Christopher (1632-1723)
NOTES: The church of St. Mildred was designed by Sir Christopher Wren and was built between 1681 and 1687. It was later destroyed during enemy action in April and May of 1941, during the Second World War.

Design for an ocean terminal complex, Karachi

RIBA20724
Skinner Bailey & Lubetkin

Festival of Britain, South Bank, London: topographical view of the exhibition buildings under construction, showing the Royal Festival Hall, Dome of Discovery and the Shot Tower from across the river

RIBA22439
London County Council. Architects Department
NOTES: The Shot Tower, designed by David Riddal Roper, was built for Thomas Maltby & Company in 1826 and remained in use for the production of lead shot balls until 1949, after which it was incorporated into the scheme for the 1951 Festival of Britain on the South Bank of the River Thames. In 1950 the top of the tower was removed and a steel-framed superstructure was added instead, providing a radio beacon for the duration of the Festival. It was demolished after the Festival to make way for the Queen Elizabeth Hall, which opened in 1967.

Festival of Britain, South Bank, London: topographical view of the exhibition buildings under construction, showing the Royal Festival Hall and the Shot Tower

RIBA22440
London County Council. Architects Department
NOTES: The Shot Tower, designed by David Riddal Roper, was built for Thomas Maltby & Company in 1826 and remained in use for the production of lead shot balls until 1949, after which it was incorporated into the scheme for the 1951 Festival of Britain on the South Bank of the River Thames. In 1950 the top of the tower was removed and a steel-framed superstructure was added instead, providing a radio beacon for the duration of the Festival. It was demolished after the Festival to make way for the Queen Elizabeth Hall, which opened in 1967.

Festival of Britain, South Bank, London: topographical view of the exhibition buildings under construction, showing the Dome of Discovery and the Power and Production Pavilion

RIBA22442
Baines, Sir George Grenfell (1908-2003)
NOTES: Baines and Reifenberg designed the Power and Production Pavilion and R. Tubbs designed the Dome of Discovery.

St Olaf House, Hay's Wharf, Tooley Street, Southwark, London, seen from the River Thames with the Nestles warehouse on the right

RIBA24312
Goodhart-Rendel, Harry Stuart (1887-1959)
NOTES: This head office building was commissioned by the Proprietors of Hay's Wharf, pioneers of cold storage, who controlled almost all the wharves on the South Bank between Tower Bridge and London Bridge from 1710-1969. The wharves closed in 1969 and the wharf buildings were eventually converted into a multi-purpose complex called the Hay's Galleria which opened in 1987. Goodhart-Rendel's building became the Consulting and Administration rooms for the London Bridge Hospital which opened in 1986.
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