Welcome to RIBApix!
You have no items in your basket.
Close
Filters
Search

Cast iron

View as Grid List
Sort by

Restaurant, the Esplanade Chapel, the Esplanade, Helsinki

RIBA108416
Granholm, Bruno F. (1857-1930)
NOTES: The original restaurant was a refreshment booth which opened on the Esplanade in 1839. The original cross-shape (hence the name Chapel) was conceived by Dalstrom who designed the restaurant in 1867 as a wooden structure with a tall central arcade flanked by lower wings. In 1891 the restaurant was enlarged and the wooden structure replaced by iron and glass, to designs by the architect Bruno F. Granholm. It was extensively renovated and restored to its 1891 incarnation in 1976 by Aino and Pekka Laurila.

Albert Dock, Liverpool: the Dock Traffic Office

RIBA117019
Hardwick, Philip (1792-1870)
NOTES: The Tuscan style columns on the portico are made from cast iron, each column cast in two sections over 17 ft (5.2 metres) high, with the architrave a single casting. The Dock Traffic Office was designed by Philip Hardwick in 1848. Another storey (just seen) was added in 1849 by Hartley.

Albert Dock, Liverpool: the Dock Traffic Office

RIBA117020
Hartley, Jesse (1780-1860)
NOTES: The Tuscan style columns on the portico are made from cast iron, each column cast in two sections over 17 ft (5.2 metres) high, with the architrave a single casting. The Dock Traffic Office was designed by Philip Hardwick in 1848. Another storey was added in 1849 by Hartley. See RIBA117041 for a colour version of this image.

Albert Dock, Liverpool: the Dock Traffic Office

RIBA117024
Hartley, Jesse (1780-1860)
NOTES: The Tuscan style columns on the portico are made from cast iron, each column cast in two sections over 17 ft (5.2 metres) high, with the architrave a single casting. The Dock Traffic Office was designed by Philip Hardwick in 1848. Another storey was added in 1849 by Hartley.

Albert Dock, Liverpool: the Dock Traffic Office

RIBA117041
Hartley, Jesse (1780-1860)
NOTES: The Tuscan style columns on the portico are made from cast iron, each column cast in two sections over 17 ft (5.2 metres) high, with the architrave a single casting. The Dock Traffic Office was designed by Philip Hardwick in 1848. Another storey was added in 1849 by Hartley. See RIBA117020 for a black and white version of this image.

Chatham Dockyard: Brunel Sawmill showing its iron-framed construction

RIBA118915
Brunel, Sir Marc Isambard (1769-1849)
NOTES: Chatham Dockyard was established as a Royal Dockyard from 1567. It closed in 1984, but has a number of surviving historic structures ranging in date from the early 18th century to the early-mid 20th century. It is now managed as a visitor attraction.

Chatham Dockyard: detail of a column and bollard

RIBA118998
NOTES: Chatham Dockyard was established as a Royal Dockyard from 1567. It closed in 1984, but has a number of suriving historic structures ranging in date from the early 18th century to the early-mid 20th century. It is now managed as a visitor attraction.

Chatham Dockyard: detail of an anchor

RIBA118999
NOTES: Chatham Dockyard was established as a Royal Dockyard from 1567. It closed in 1984, but has a number of surviving historic structures ranging in date from the early 18th century to the early-mid 20th century. It is now managed as a visitor attraction. See RIBA119005 for a colour version of this image.

Chatham Dockyard: detail of a capstan

RIBA119000
NOTES: Chatham Dockyard was established as a Royal Dockyard from 1567. It closed in 1984, but has a number of surviving historic structures ranging in date from the early 18th century to the early-mid 20th century. It is now managed as a visitor attraction.

Chatham Dockyard: detail of an anchor

RIBA119005
NOTES: Chatham Dockyard was established as a Royal Dockyard from 1567. It closed in 1984, but has a number of surviving historic structures ranging in date from the early 18th century to the early-mid 20th century. It is now managed as a visitor attraction. See RIBA118999 for a black and white version of this image.

Paddington Station, London: the train shed roof

RIBA119919
Brunel, Isambard Kingdom (1806-1859)
NOTES: Isambard Kingdom Brunel, engineer of the Great Western Railway, designed this London terminus for the railway company with the assistance of the architect, Sir Matthew Digby Wyatt. See RIBA157809 for a colour version of this image.

Paddington Station, London: the train shed with four Inter-City 125 trains lined up

RIBA119920
Brunel, Isambard Kingdom (1806-1859)
NOTES: Isambard Kingdom Brunel, engineer of the Great Western Railway, designed this London terminus for the railway company with the assistance of the architect, Sir Matthew Digby Wyatt. See RIBA119942 for a colour version of this image.
Close
)
CLOSE