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Bredon Barn, Bredon, Worcestershire: the re-raftered barn

RIBA110993
Charles, Frederick. W. B. (1912-2002)
NOTES: The barn at Bredon is an aisled structure of nine bays, with Cotswold stone walls and a stone slate roof. It is 134 feet long and has an equal width and height of 44 feet, and a loft approached by an external stair. It was distinguished from other great medieval barns in that it was inhabited by the Reeve (the estate overseer) and his family, so contained a fireplace, a stone lavatory and garderobe. It was badly damaged by fire in 1980. It was completely restored in 1983 by Frederick Charles, father of the photographer Martin Charles. See RIBA115004 for a black and white version of this image.

Bredon Barn, Bredon, Worcestershire: detail of the roof with its new rafters

RIBA110994
Charles, Frederick. W. B. (1912-2002)
NOTES: The barn at Bredon is an aisled structure of nine bays, with Cotswold stone walls and a stone slate roof. It is 134 feet long and has an equal width and height of 44 feet, and a loft approached by an external stair. It was distinguished from other great medieval barns in that it was inhabited by the Reeve (the estate overseer) and his family, so contained a fireplace, a stone lavatory and garderobe. It was badly damaged by fire in 1980. It was completely restored in 1983 by Frederick Charles, father of the photographer Martin Charles. See RIBA115006 for a black and white version of this image.

Bredon Barn, Bredon, Worcestershire, the west side and north gable during restoration

RIBA110995
Charles, Frederick. W. B. (1912-2002)
NOTES: The barn at Bredon is an aisled structure of nine bays, with Cotswold stone walls and a stone slate roof. It is 134 feet long and has an equal width and height of 44 feet, and a loft approached by an external stair. It was distinguished from other great medieval barns in that it was inhabited by the Reeve (the estate overseer) and his family, so contained a fireplace, a stone lavatory and garderobe. It was badly damaged by fire in 1980. It was completely restored in 1983 by Frederick Charles, father of the photographer Martin Charles. See RIBA115010 for a black and white version of this image.

Bredon Barn, Bredon, Worcestershire: looking towards the north gable showing the new roof trusses

RIBA110996
Charles, Frederick. W. B. (1912-2002)
NOTES: The barn at Bredon is an aisled structure of nine bays, with Cotswold stone walls and a stone slate roof. It is 134 feet long and has an equal width and height of 44 feet, and a loft approached by an external stair. It was distinguished from other great medieval barns in that it was inhabited by the Reeve (the estate overseer) and his family, so contained a fireplace, a stone lavatory and garderobe. It was badly damaged by fire in 1980. It was completely restored in 1983 by Frederick Charles, father of the photographer Martin Charles. See RIBA110999 for a black and white version of this image.

Bredon Barn, Bredon, Worcestershire: looking north showing all the main trusses erected

RIBA110997
Charles, Frederick. W. B. (1912-2002)
NOTES: The barn at Bredon is an aisled structure of nine bays, with Cotswold stone walls and a stone slate roof. It is 134 feet long and has an equal width and height of 44 feet, and a loft approached by an external stair. It was distinguished from other great medieval barns in that it was inhabited by the Reeve (the estate overseer) and his family, so contained a fireplace, a stone lavatory and garderobe. It was badly damaged by fire in 1980. It was completely restored in 1983 by Frederick Charles, father of the photographer Martin Charles. See RIBA115000 for a black and white version of this image.

Bredon Barn, Bredon, Worcestershire: detail of the roof construction showing the arcade plates in the north gable

RIBA110998
Charles, Frederick. W. B. (1912-2002)
NOTES: The barn at Bredon is an aisled structure of nine bays, with Cotswold stone walls and a stone slate roof. It is 134 feet long and has an equal width and height of 44 feet, and a loft approached by an external stair. It was distinguished from other great medieval barns in that it was inhabited by the Reeve (the estate overseer) and his family, so contained a fireplace, a stone lavatory and garderobe. It was badly damaged by fire in 1980. It was completely restored in 1983 by Frederick Charles, father of the photographer Martin Charles.

Bredon Barn, Bredon, Worcestershire: looking towards the north gable showing the new timber trusses

RIBA110999
Charles, Frederick. W. B. (1912-2002)
NOTES: The barn at Bredon is an aisled structure of nine bays, with Cotswold stone walls and a stone slate roof. It is 134 feet long and has an equal width and height of 44 feet, and a loft approached by an external stair. It was distinguished from other great medieval barns in that it was inhabited by the Reeve (the estate overseer) and his family, so contained a fireplace, a stone lavatory and garderobe. It was badly damaged by fire in 1980. It was completely restored in 1983 by Frederick Charles, father of the photographer Martin Charles. See RIBA110996 for a colour version of this image.

Villa Saraceno, Finale di Agugliaro, Vicenza; the great barn or tezza

RIBA113927
Palladio, Andrea (1508-1580)
NOTES: The Villa Saraceno is one of the earliest and simplest of Palladio's villas (1549-1555). As published in 'I Quattro Libri', only the villa house was built according to Palladio's design, and the symmetrical 'barchesse' shown in his scheme were never fully executed. The colonnaded 'barchessa' on the right (east) of the villa house was added in the mid-17th century and links to the other existing farm buildings on the site. After becoming derelict in the mid-twentieth century, it was bought by the Landmark Trust and restored in 1990-1994. The great barn seen here is some 45 metres long (150 feet) and pre-dates the house. It was built circa 1500 and still retains its original roof trusses, spanning some 45 feet.

Villa Saraceno, Finale di Agugliaro, Vicenza: looking towards the villa from the great barn or tezza

RIBA113928
Palladio, Andrea (1508-1580)
NOTES: The Villa Saraceno is one of the earliest and simplest of Palladio's villas (1549-1555). As published in 'I Quattro Libri', only the villa house was built according to Palladio's design, and the symmetrical 'barchesse' shown in his scheme were never fully executed. The colonnaded 'barchessa' on the right (east) of the villa house was added in the mid-17th century and links to the other existing farm buildings on the site. After becoming derelict in the mid-twentieth century, it was bought by the Landmark Trust and restored in 1990-1994. The great barn seen here is some 45 metres long (150 feet) and pre-dates the house. It was built circa 1500 and still retains its original roof trusses, spanning some 45 feet.

Villa Saraceno, Finale di Agugliaro, Vicenza: looking towards the great barn or tezza from the barchessa

RIBA113931
Palladio, Andrea (1508-1580)
NOTES: The Villa Saraceno is one of the earliest and simplest of Palladio's villas (1549-1555). As published in 'I Quattro Libri', only the villa house was built according to Palladio's design, and the symmetrical 'barchesse' shown in his scheme were never fully executed. The colonnaded 'barchessa' on the right (east) of the villa house was added in the mid-17th century and links to the other existing farm buildings on the site. After becoming derelict in the mid-twentieth century, it was bought by the Landmark Trust and restored in 1990-1994. The great barn seen here is some 45 metres long (150 feet) and pre-dates the house. It was built circa 1500, half demolished in the late 18th century, but still retains its original roof trusses which span some 45 feet.

Villa Saraceno, Finale di Agugliaro, Vicenza: the great barn or tezza

RIBA113934
Palladio, Andrea (1508-1580)
NOTES: The Villa Saraceno is one of the earliest and simplest of Palladio's villas (1549-1555). As published in 'I Quattro Libri', only the villa house was built according to Palladio's design, and the symmetrical 'barchesse' shown in his scheme were never fully executed. The colonnaded 'barchessa' on the right (east) of the villa house was added in the mid-17th century and links to the other existing farm buildings on the site. After becoming derelict in the mid-twentieth century, it was bought by the Landmark Trust and restored in 1990-1994. The great barn seen here is some 45 metres long (150 feet) and pre-dates the house. It was built circa 1500 and still retains its original roof trusses, spanning some 45 feet.

Bredon Barn, Bredon, Worcestershire: looking towards the north gable showing all the main trusses erected

RIBA115000
Charles, Frederick. W. B. (1912-2002)
NOTES: The barn at Bredon is an aisled structure of nine bays, with Cotswold stone walls and a stone slate roof. It is 134 feet long and has an equal width and height of 44 feet, and a loft approached by an external stair. It was distinguished from other great medieval barns in that it was inhabited by the Reeve (the estate overseer) and his family, so contained a fireplace, a stone lavatory and garderobe. It was badly damaged by fire in 1980. It was completely restored in 1983 by Frederick Charles, father of the photographer Martin Charles. See RIBA110997 for a colour version of this image.
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