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Whittington's College, College Hill, City of London: study of the entrance portals

RIBA35287
NOTES: This sketch is one of a number of preliminary studies of English Baroque architecture made by Charles Cockerell in preparation for his watercolour composition 'A Tribute to Sir Christopher Wren' (1838). It was formerly part of an album of drawings entitled 'Ichnographia Publica', compiled by Cockerell from 1825 as a private 'scrapbook' containing his measured drawings, notes and studies relating to the architecture of public buildings. The bracketed numbers which accompany many of the sketches refer to the numbered 'key' to the engraved version of 'A Tribute to Sir Christopher Wren'. Sir Richard 'Dick' Whittington first became Lord Mayor of London in 1398 and Whittington College was set up in his name in the early 15th century. The college (or hospital) was attached to the church of St Michael Paternoster Royal and served as an almshouse for the poor.

Design for almshouses (Holy Trinity Hospital), Retford, Nottinghamshire: perspective

RIBA37931
Blore, Edward (1787-1879)
NOTES: The almshouses were built 1832-1834 with alterations later in 1872.

Lord Leycester Hospital, West Gate, High Street, Warwick: the archway to the street

RIBA38003
NOTES: The Hospital for aged or disabled soldiers and their wives was founded in 1571 by Robert Dudley, Earl of Leycester (Leicester). The medieval buildings which he acquired under charter from Queen Elizabeth I were the premises of the combined guilds of Holy Trinity and St George. The guilds had been created in the 14th century, but the premises must have been rebuilt in the 15th century. The Hospital continued to run under the terms of its original charter until 1956. The site comprises the medieval Hospital, the Chapel (built in 1383), reception rooms, living quarters (including the Master's House), a Guildhall (completed by 1450) and a Great Hall, all of which were extensively restored between 1956 and 1968.

Lord Leycester Hospital, West Gate, High Street, Warwick: the covered stairway in the courtyard

RIBA38004
NOTES: The Hospital for aged or disabled soldiers and their wives was founded in 1571 by Robert Dudley, Earl of Leycester (Leicester). The medieval buildings which he acquired under charter from Queen Elizabeth I were the premises of the combined guilds of Holy Trinity and St George. The guilds had been created in the 14th century, but the premises must have been rebuilt in the 15th century. The Hospital continued to run under the terms of its original charter until 1956. The site comprises the medieval Hospital, the Chapel (built in 1383), reception rooms, living quarters (including the Master's House), a Guildhall (completed by 1450) and a Great Hall, all of which were extensively restored between 1956 and 1968.

Lord Leycester Hospital, West Gate, High Street, Warwick: the medieval half-timber buildings clustered around the original Norman gateway into the city

RIBA38005
NOTES: The Hospital for aged or disabled soldiers and their wives was founded in 1571 by Robert Dudley, Earl of Leycester (Leicester). The medieval buildings which he acquired under charter from Queen Elizabeth I were the premises of the combined guilds of Holy Trinity and St George. The guilds had been created in the 14th century, but the premises must have been rebuilt in the 15th century. The Hospital continued to run under the terms of its original charter until 1956. The site comprises the medieval Hospital, the Chapel (built in 1383), reception rooms, living quarters (including the Master's House), a Guildhall (completed by 1450) and a Great Hall, all of which were extensively restored between 1956 and 1968.

Lord Leycester Hospital, West Gate, High Street, Warwick: the archway to the street seen from the courtyard

RIBA38006
NOTES: The Hospital for aged or disabled soldiers and their wives was founded in 1571 by Robert Dudley, Earl of Leycester (Leicester). The medieval buildings which he acquired under charter from Queen Elizabeth I were the premises of the combined guilds of Holy Trinity and St George. The guilds had been created in the 14th century, but the premises must have been rebuilt in the 15th century. The Hospital continued to run under the terms of its original charter until 1956. The site comprises the medieval Hospital, the Chapel (built in 1383), reception rooms, living quarters (including the Master's House), a Guildhall (completed by 1450) and a Great Hall, all of which were extensively restored between 1956 and 1968.

Hospital of St Cross and Almshouse of Noble Poverty, Winchester: the Beaufort Tower entrance adorned with the Royal Coats of Arms

RIBA38815
NOTES: Henry de Blois, appointed Bishop of Winchester in 1129 at the age of 28, founded the Hospital of St Cross in 1136, which consisted of a church with hospital buildings on the south side. It is England's oldest charitable institution. The Almshouse of Noble Poverty was added by Cardinal Beaufort within a few years of 1445.

Hospital of St Cross and Almshouse of Noble Poverty, Winchester: the oriel window on the eastern or infirmary range

RIBA38816
NOTES: Henry de Blois, appointed Bishop of Winchester in 1129 at the age of 28, founded the Hospital of St Cross in 1136, which consisted of a church with hospital buildings on the south side. It is England's oldest charitable institution. The Almshouse of Noble Poverty was added by Cardinal Beaufort within a few years of 1445.

Hospital of St Cross and Almshouse of Noble Poverty, Winchester

RIBA38817
NOTES: Henry de Blois, appointed Bishop of Winchester in 1129 at the age of 28, founded the Hospital of St Cross in 1136, which consisted of a church with hospital buildings on the south side. It is England's oldest charitable institution. The Almshouse of Noble Poverty was added by Cardinal Beaufort within a few years of 1445.

Proti Hospice and Oratory, Vicenza: the courtyard

RIBA39930
Pizzacaro, Antonio (1605-1680)
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